Mr. Sammler's planet

Front Cover
Viking Press, 1970 - Fiction - 313 pages
20 Reviews
Mr. Artur Sammler, Holocaust survivor, intellectual, and occasional lecturer at Columbia University in 1960s New York City, is a aregistrar of madness,a a refined and civilized being caught among people crazy with the promises of the future (moon landings, endless possibilities). His Cyclopean gaze reflects on the degradations of city life while looking deep into the sufferings of the human soul. aSorry for all and sore at heart,a he observes how greater luxury and leisure have only led to more human suffering. To Mr. Sammlerawho by the end of this ferociously unsentimental novel has found the compassionate consciousness necessary to bridge the gap between himself and his fellow beingsaa good life is one in which a person does what is arequired of him.a To know and to meet the aterms of the contracta was as true a life as one could live. At its heart, this novel is quintessential Bellow: moral, urbane, sublimely humane.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
5
4 stars
3
3 stars
5
2 stars
6
1 star
1

Review: Mr. Sammler's Planet

User Review  - Jon - Goodreads

This book vastly lowered my estimation of Saul Bellow, which was based primarily on the quality of the novella, Seize the Day. Like Seize the Day, Mr. Sammler's Planet certainly has compelling moments ... Read full review

Review: Mr. Sammler's Planet

User Review  - Jason - Goodreads

No, this isn't a science fiction novel. Saul Bellows presents an empathetic portrayal of a Jewish holocaust survivor who finds himself haunted by his experiences during the war who is now as an ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
52
Section 3
104
Copyright

3 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1970)

Saul Bellow was born June 10th, 1915, in Lachine, Quebec, Canada, the son of Jewish immigrants from St. Petersburg, Russia. His family later moved to Chicago, the site of many of his future works. Bellow was the product of a diverse cultural heritage, and was educated in English, French, and Yiddish linguistics, although it is Yiddish that is thought to have been the greatest influence on his writing. Bellow studied anthropology and sociology at the University of Chicago and Northwestern University, and although he went on to pursue a doctorate at the University of Wisconsin, he eventually dropped out. He has taught at the University of Minnesota, Princeton University, the University of Chicago, New York University, and Boston University. Bellow is one of the most highly recognized and acclaimed Jewish American writers. He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship which enabled him to live in Paris while completing much of The Adventures of Augie March (1953). In addition to the 1975 Pulitzer Prize for Humboldt's Gift, Bellow won the 1976 Nobel Prize in Literature for his understanding and analysis of contemporary culture. He received three National Book Awards. Included among his works are Seize the Day (1956), Henderson the Rain King (1959), Herzog (1964), Mr. Sammler's Planet (1970), To Jerusalem and Back (1976), Him With His Foot in His Mouth and Other Stories (1984), More Die of Heartbreak (1987), and Something to Remember Me By (1990).

Bibliographic information