Herzog

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Viking Press, Jun 21, 1976 - Fiction - 540 pages
12 Reviews

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Review: Herzog

User Review  - Jan - Goodreads

Why should we read Saul Bellow today, and why Herzog? Bellow, who won the Nobel Prize for Literature, is the only three time winner of the National Book Award for fiction. The Times of London ... Read full review

Review: Herzog

User Review  - Stela - Goodreads

"Pray tell me, Sir, whose dog are you?" What is the world for the intellectual? The playground of his ideas or the hell of his emotions? For Moses Hezog, a forty-seven-year old former Professor in a ... Read full review

Contents

A Comment on Form and Despair
386
gabr1el jos1pov1c1 Bellow and Herzog
401
A Review
416
Copyright

6 other sections not shown

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About the author (1976)

Saul Bellow was born June 10th, 1915, in Lachine, Quebec, Canada, the son of Jewish immigrants from St. Petersburg, Russia. His family later moved to Chicago, the site of many of his future works. Bellow was the product of a diverse cultural heritage, and was educated in English, French, and Yiddish linguistics, although it is Yiddish that is thought to have been the greatest influence on his writing. Bellow studied anthropology and sociology at the University of Chicago and Northwestern University, and although he went on to pursue a doctorate at the University of Wisconsin, he eventually dropped out. He has taught at the University of Minnesota, Princeton University, the University of Chicago, New York University, and Boston University. Bellow is one of the most highly recognized and acclaimed Jewish American writers. He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship which enabled him to live in Paris while completing much of The Adventures of Augie March (1953). In addition to the 1975 Pulitzer Prize for Humboldt's Gift, Bellow won the 1976 Nobel Prize in Literature for his understanding and analysis of contemporary culture. He received three National Book Awards. Included among his works are Seize the Day (1956), Henderson the Rain King (1959), Herzog (1964), Mr. Sammler's Planet (1970), To Jerusalem and Back (1976), Him With His Foot in His Mouth and Other Stories (1984), More Die of Heartbreak (1987), and Something to Remember Me By (1990).

A self-styled "democratic socialist," founder and editor of the radical journal Dissent, and a regular contributor to The New Republic, Howe was professor of English at Hunter College. His first book, Sherwood Anderson (1951), made a substantial impression on his contemporaries and firmly established his reputation as a critic. He wrote several volumes of essays on literary topics---some of these with an emphasis on political commitments---all informed by a sensitive critical intellect. He felt that the fundamental problem with modern culture is that we look for meaning of life outside of it, rather than engaging with social and cultural issues as concerned citizens, active members of civil society. Howe insisted that moderation threatens our social order as much as radicalism because it is "passive, indifferent and atomized." His valuable introduction to The Idea of the Modern in Literature and the Arts (1971) reveals an uncomfortable awareness of the difficulties of modernism and a deep dissatisfaction with the limited role of the contemporary critic. By contrast, Howe wanted criticism to form our tastes, to come to the defense of literacy, and to confirm the ideal of individual imagination. Another of Howe's works, World of Our Fathers (1976), is a look at the lives of Jewish immigrants in New York during the early years of the century.