Connected: The Surprising Power of Our Social Networks and How They Shape Our Lives (Google eBook)

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Hachette Digital, Inc., Sep 28, 2009 - Social Science - 388 pages
24 Reviews
Your colleague's husband's sister can make you fat, even if you don't know her. A happy neighbor has more impact on your happiness than a happy spouse. These startling revelations of how much we truly influence one another are revealed in the studies of Drs. Christakis and Fowler, which have repeatedly made front-page news nationwide.

In CONNECTED, the authors explain why emotions are contagious, how health behaviors spread, why the rich get richer, even how we find and choose our partners. Intriguing and entertaining, CONNECTED overturns the notion of the individual and provides a revolutionary paradigm-that social networks influence our ideas, emotions, health, relationships, behavior, politics, and much more. It will change the way we think about every aspect of our lives.



  

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Review: Connected: The Surprising Power of Our Social Networks and How They Shape Our Lives

User Review  - T. Edmund - Goodreads

Non-fiction is always such a risk, especially anything that could be considered pop-psychology. Connected paid off however, presenting an interesting thesis, with little page filler or rehash of psyc ... Read full review

Review: Connected: The Surprising Power of Our Social Networks and How They Shape Our Lives

User Review  - Raluca Popescu - Goodreads

A rather "classical" pop-science book, using simplified research and examples to explain, this time, the interesting-ness and power of human networks. Going from prehistoric social mechanisms to ... Read full review

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Contents

Preface
CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER 2
CHAPTER 3
CHAPTER 4
CHAPTER 5
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 8
CHAPTER 9
Acknowledgments
Notes
Illustration Credits
About the Authors
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Nicholas A. Christakis, M.D., Ph.D., is an associate professor of medicine and sociology at the University of Chicago.

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