Meteorology: For Scientists and Engineers

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Thomson Learning, 2000 - Meteorology. - 502 pages
2 Reviews
The Second Edition of Roland Stull's METEOROLOGY FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS lets professors quantify the concepts in Ahren's METEOROLOGY TODAY, SEVENTH EDITION like never before. This book can serve as a technical companion to Ahren's text or as a stand-alone text. It provides the mathematical equations needed for a higher level of understanding of meteorology. The organization is mapped directly to the Ahrens book, making Stull's text a perfect companion. More than a lab manual or workbook, this text contains detailed math and physics that expand upon concepts presented in Ahrens' text, as well as numerous solved problems. This text demonstrates how to use mathematical equations (algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and finite differential equations) to explain the dominant characteristics of certain atmospheric phenomena and processes. Benefits: * NEW! Extensively updated and revised throughout, it now contains more problems and a more accessible writing style. * NEW! End-of-chapter material now includes numerical problems, Understanding and Critical Evaluation, Web-enhanced Questions, and Synthesis Questions. * NEW! The range of problem levels is increased, from easier to more difficult. * NEW! Beyond Algebra boxes provide students with experience in calculus further study. * NEW! A new Final Threads section ties the material in a new chapter to other lessons within the book. * More than a problems book, the extensive narrative provides students with understanding of the math and detail (graphs, diagrams, maps and boxes) that explain important weather events. * Focus Boxes feature important historical developments in meteorology to demonstrate the process of science. * Solved Example boxes provide students with worked out problems to show students a good example of the problem solving process.

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Contents

Radiation
24
Radiation Principles
29
Summary
38
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Roland Stull is Professor and Chair of Atmospheric Sciences in the Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences at the University of British Columbia (UBC), Canada, and Director of the Geophysical Disaster Computational Fluid Dynamics Center. He was a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for sixteen years before moving to The University of British Columbia in 1995. His early work in boundary-layer meteorology took him to Africa, Europe, and many sites in America for airborne field experiments, while his current research on numerical weather prediction utilizes massively-parallel computer clusters. He has taught courses in 20 different topics, ranging from a survey course on natural disasters with enrollments of 1,000 students, to graduate-level courses on non-linear dynamics and chaos. In addition to METEOROLOGY FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS, he has written an upper-level text, AN INTRODUCTION TO BOUNDARY-LAYER METEOROLOGY (Kluwer, İ1989), which is now in its eighth printing. He is a Certified Consulting Meteorologist, as well as a Certified Flight Instructor in the United States.

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