Shades of Gray: National Security and the Evolution of Space Reconnaissance

Front Cover
AIAA, 2005 - Social Science - 613 pages
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The United States has developed the most expensive and capable reconnaissance satellites the world has ever seen. American satellites can photograph terrorist bases, listen in on radio conversations, sniff out clandestine nuclear tests and spot rocket launches anywhere in the world. The goal of these assets, simply put, is to prevent surprises. In Shades of Gray, Dr. L. Parker Temple III describes the development of these capabilities in unprecedented historical detail and context. He taps recently declassified documents and melds them with his own behind-the-scenes experiences as an Air Force space expert at the Pentagon in the 1980s. In this work, Temple tracks the evolution of space reconnaissance systems from their seeds in the painful lessons of Pearl Harbor through the challenges of today. More than any other book, Shades of Gray places development of these capabilities into their proper context with the overall U.S. space program.
  

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Contents

Threat Evolution
3
Rise of Strategic Forces
11
Airborne Reconnaissance Before the U2
23
Unsteady Rise of Science Advice
43
Technological Capabilities Pave the Way
55
Doctrine Policy and Organization
73
Chapter? Overflight Goes Away But the Threat Remains
91
Space Reconnaissance and Human Spaceflight
127
Policy and Doctrine
293
Square Pegs and Finding Niches
313
Military Human SpaceflightMoth to the Flame
403
Old Plans Are No PlansThe Search for Relevance
453
One for All and All for One
469
Getting the Doctrine Right
563
Endgame
585
Conclusion
593

Missiles and Interservice Conflict
181
Organization Congress and the Beginnings
191
Supporting Materials
613
Copyright

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