Homes of Family Names in Great Britain (Google eBook)

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Harrison and Sons, 1890 - Great Britain - 601 pages
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Page 15 - but," says Camden, " shortly after, as the Romans of better sort had three names, according to that of Juvenal, Tanquam habeas tria nomina, and that of Ausonins, Tria nomina nobiliorum; so it seemed a disgrace for a gentleman to have but one single name, as the meaner sort and bastards had.
Page 77 - The Names of the Nobility, Gentry, and others, who contributed to the Defence of this Country at the time of the Spanish Invasion, in 1588.
Page 311 - See, fierce from the border, Wolf.like he rushes ; Drives southward the Warder. Gore-stream forth gushes : Come Spearman, come Bowman, Come bold-hearted Truewicke ; Repel the proud foe-man ; Join lion.like Bewicke.f From Fenwicke and Denwicke, Harlow and Hallington : J Sound bugle at Alnwicke, Bag-pipe at Wallington : On Elf hills th' alarm Wisp Smoulders in pale ray ; Maids, babes that can scarce lisp, Point trembling the bale-way.
Page 312 - Leave loom and smithie ; Come with your trusty yew, Strong arm and pithy. Leave the herd on the hill. Lowing and flying ; Leave the vill, cot, and mill, The dead and the dying. Come, clad in your steel jack, Your war gear in order ; And down hew, or drive back, The Scot o'er the Border. And yield you to no man ; Stand firm in the vanguard ; Brave death in each foeman, Or die on the green-sward.
Page 1 - Next after the gentry, in respect of that political weight which depends on the ownership of land, was ranked the great body of freeholders, the yeomanry of the middle ages, a body which, in antiquity of possession and purity of extraction, was probably superior to the classes that looked down upon it as ignoble.
Page 9 - Behold the original and primitive nobility of all those great persons who are too proud now not only to till the ground, but almost to tread upon it. We may talk what we please of lilies and lions rampant, and spread eagles in fields d'or or d'argent; but if heraldry were guided by reason, a plough in a field arable would be the most noble and ancient arms.
Page 55 - consisted mainly of several strata, unequally distributed, of Celtic-speaking people, who in race and physical type, however, partook more of the tall blond stock of Northern Europe than of the thick-set, broad-headed, dark stock which Broca has called Celts.
Page 311 - Maids, babes that can scare lisp, Point trembling the bale-way. Leave the plough, leave the mow, Leave loom and smithie ; Come with your trusty yew, Strong arm and pithy. Leave the herd on the hill. Lowing and flying ; Leave the vill, cot, and mill, The dead and the dying. Come, clad in your steel jack, Your war gear in...
Page 68 - seven justices of peace not known "to be of any religion, and therefore suspected to ''be Papists,'' in 1580, were "John Poole of Poole, " and Sir Rowland Stanley " [of Hooton]. Among the names of the nobility and gentry who contributed to the defence of the country at the time of the Spanish Armada, 1588, appears that of "John Poole, armiger, 9 die Marcii 25...
Page 1 - English yeomen in the past were a stay-at-home people, passing uneventful lives on their own aeres, which frequently remained in the hands of the same family for five or six generations, and were handed on from father to son with a regularity that betokened long life and but natural decay.

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