Lilith the First Eve: Historical and Psychological Aspects of the Dark Feminine

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Daimon, Oct 29, 2007 - Social Science - 262 pages
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In a facinating excursion though the history of her myth, Seigmund Hurwitz presents and interprets the ancient dark-winged goddess Lilth, aslo know as "the first Eve". The authors extraoridnary meticulous study of the original sources brings to light a stiking figure long lost from our awareness, yet highly relevant to a psychological understanding of today's evolving masculine and feminine identities. Case material from his analytical practice imbeds Lilith in the everyday problems of contemporary life. That an unbridled life-urge which refuses to be assimilated lies behind depression...seems to me to be a new and important discovery. By combining the experience of a comtemporaryman with this historical material, Seigmund Hurwitz sheds new light on both. - From the Foreword by Marie-Louise von Franz
  

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well researched but strict interpretation Read full review

Contents

The Dual Aspect of Lilith
31
a The Lamashtû Aspect
34
b The Ishtar Aspect of Lilith
57
The Arslan Tash Inscriptions and the Burney Relief
63
b Arslan Tash II
76
c The Burney Relief
79
Lilith in the Bible and Talmud
84
The Aramaic Magic Texts
90
Lilith in Arabic Literature the Karina
136
Lilith in the Kabbalah Lilith and Samael
139
Amulets against Lilith
149
The First Encounter The Lilith Dream
155
Lilith and Saturn Melancholy
163
Lilith and Adam The Power Struggle
177
Fear and Fascination
194
The Second Encounter An Active Imagination
201

Lilith in Gnosticism
103
Pseudepigraphic Writings
115
b The Alphabet of ben Sira
119
c The Book of Raziel
127
Lilith in Folk Legend
129
PsychologoReligious Reflections
216
Bibliography
237
Index of Authors
248
Subject Index
251
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Dr. Seigmund Hurwitz was a member of the innermost circle of C.G. Jung's so called Zurich school and he received his analytical training from Jung, Toni Wolff and Marie-Louise von Franz. He was long a scholar of Jewish mysticism and, with his gift for language, was often sought out by Jung and others when there were ancient texts to be consulted. Dr. Hurwitz published numerous articles and books over the course of his long lifetime, and he continues to maintain a small analytical practice in Zurich until his death in the Summer of 1994.

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