The Birth of the Mind: How a Tiny Number of Genes Creates the Complexities of Human Thought

Front Cover
Basic Books, 2004 - Psychology - 278 pages
8 Reviews
In The Birth of the Mind, award-winning cognitive scientist Gary Marcus irrevocably alters the nature vs. nurture debate by linking the findings of the Human Genome Project to the development of the brain. Scientists have long struggled to understand how a tiny number of genes could contain the instructions for building the human brain, arguably the most complex device in the known universe. Synthesizing up-to-the-minute research with his own original findings on child development, Marcus is the first to resolve this apparent contradiction. Vibrantly written and completely accessible to the lay reader, The Birth of the Mind will forever change the way we think about our origins and ourselves.

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Review: The Birth of the Mind: How a Tiny Number of Genes Creates The Complexities of Human Thought

User Review  - Sam Chittenden - Goodreads

This book was the first scientific book I read that I actually enjoyed. I read it for a 9th grade book report (you're reading it now), and it wasn't just some professor rambling on for hours. It is a ... Read full review

Review: The Birth of the Mind: How a Tiny Number of Genes Creates The Complexities of Human Thought

User Review  - Abdulla Al-shammari - Goodreads

Perfect introduction to genes for the non specialist. The flow of the book is smooth and it keeps you engaged. Will read more books by this author for sure as he has that rare gift of simplifying complex ideas. Read full review

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About the author (2004)

Gary Marcus is Associate Professor of Psychology at New York University. Author of The Algebraic Mind, Marcus received his Ph.D. from MIT at the age of twenty-three. In 2002-2003, he is a Fellow of the Stanford Center for Advanced Study in Behavioral Sciences. He lives in New York City. To learn more about Marcus' work, please visit http://www.psych.nyu.edu/gary/birth.html

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