The Conquest of Happiness

Front Cover
W. W. Norton & Company, 1996 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 191 pages
23 Reviews
"My purpose is to suggest a cure for the ordinary day-to-day unhappiness from which most people in civilized countries suffer, and which is all the more unbearable because, having no obvious external cause, appears inescapable."
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
10
4 stars
8
3 stars
4
2 stars
0
1 star
1

Review: The Conquest of Happiness

User Review  - Ana - Goodreads

Let's just say lately I've been picking up books that are easy enough to read, but still carry a bit of substance. This would translate into easy philosophy, and though I know it's judged for it's ... Read full review

Review: The Conquest of Happiness

User Review  - PJ Sullivan - Goodreads

Bertrand Russell was the quintessential rational man. In this book he applies rationality to psychology in a systematic examination of human thinking and motivations. Without denying the importance of ... Read full review

Contents

Preface
11
Is Happiness Still Possible?
113
Zest
124
Affection
137
The Family
145
Work
162
Impersonal Interests
170
Effort and Resignation
178
The Happy Man
186
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1996)

Bertrand Arthur William Russell (1872-1970) was a British philosopher, logician, essayist and social critic. He was best known for his work in mathematical logic and analytic philosophy. Together with G.E. Moore, Russell is generally recognized as one of the main founders of modern analytic philosophy. Together with Kurt Gödel, he is regularly credited with being one of the most important logicians of the twentieth century. Over the course of a long career, Russell also made contributions to a broad range of subjects, including the history of ideas, ethics, political and educational theory, and religious studies. General readers have benefited from his many popular writings on a wide variety of topics. After a life marked by controversy--including dismissals from both Trinity College, Cambridge, and City College, New York--Russell was awarded the Order of Merit in 1949 and the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1950. Noted also for his many spirited anti-nuclear protests and for his campaign against western involvement in the Vietnam War, Russell remained a prominent public figure until his death at the age of 97.

Bibliographic information