Self-portrait in a convex mirror: poems

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Penguin Books, 1976 - Fiction - 83 pages
79 Reviews
John Ashberry won the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, and the National Book Critics Circle Award for Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror . Ashberry reaffirms the poetic powers that have made him such an outstanding figure in contemporary literature. This new book continues his astonishing explorations of places where no one has ever been.

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Review: Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror

User Review  - Myles - Goodreads

(4.0/5.0) This John Ashbery is a cool dude. But he's hopelessly academic and archaic, and those aren't qualities we're allowed to celebrate anymore (or ever). Read full review

Review: Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror

User Review  - Daniel - Goodreads

One of the most important individual volumes of poetry ever published. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, the National Book Award, and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Even if you end up ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
28
Section 2
29
Section 3
37
Copyright

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About the author (1976)

John Ashbery was born in Rochester, New York, in 1927. He earned degrees from Harvard and Columbia, and went to France as a Fulbright Scholar in 1955, living there for much of the next decade. His many collections include "Notes from the Air: Selected Later Poems" (2007), which was awarded the International Gri=n Poetry Prize. "Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror" (1975) won the three major American prizes--the Pulitzer, the National Book Award, and the National Book Critics Circle Award--and an early book, "Some Trees" (1956), was selected by W. H. Auden for the Yale Younger Poets Series. The Library of America published the first volume of his collected poems in 2008. Active in various areas of the arts throughout his career, he has served as executive editor of Art News and as art critic for "New York" magazine and "Newsweek". He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and he was a chancellor of the Academy of American Poets from 1988 to 1999. He has received two Guggenheim Fellowships and was a MacArthur Fellow from 1985 to 1990. His work has been translated into more than twenty-five languages. He lives in New York.

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