Winners, Losers & Microsoft: Competition and Antitrust in High Technology

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Independent Institute, Mar 1, 2001 - Business & Economics - 325 pages
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Few issues in high technology are as divisive as the current debate over competition, innovation, and antitrust. Analyzing famous examples of economic “lock-in” by dominant corporations of supposedly inferior products, this book makes the case that free markets in high technology industry deliver better products to consumers, at lower prices, without government intervention. This publication's careful scholarship, well-founded hypotheses, and refutations of previously accepted theories—extending far beyond the Microsoft case—make this publication a vital piece of understanding for the future of technology and economics.

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Contents

The Theory
47
The Real World
117
Appendices
245
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

\Stan J. Liebowitz is a professor of managerial economics and the academic associate dean in the school of management at the University of Texas at Dallas. He has written on the topics of copyright and technology, broadcasting regulation, pricing practices, and mortgage discrimination. Stephen E. Margolis is a professor of economics and the head of the economics department in the college of management at North Carolina State University. His research includes work on housing markets, pricing of medical services, monopolistic competition, and economic efficiency in the law. They have jointly written numerous scholarly articles on the subjects of network effects and lock-in that have appeared in the Journal of Law, Economics and Organization; Harvard Journal of Law and Technology; and the Journal of Law and Economics. Their more popular articles have been published in the Christian Science Monitor, Investor’s Business Daily, and the Wall Street Journal.

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