Strangers in Blood: Fur Trade Company Families in Indian Country

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UBC Press, Jan 1, 1980 - History - 255 pages
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The North American fur trade of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries was a vividly complex and changing social world. "Strangers in Blood" fills a major gap in fur trade literature by systematically examining the traders as a group -- their backgrounds, social patterns, domestic lives and families, and the problems of their offspring.
  

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Review: Strangers in Blood: Fur Trade Company Families in Indian Country

User Review  - Heather Pundt - Goodreads

Good overview on the subject and easy to read. Sadly it didn't answer as many questions about the NW experience as I was hoping, but a great source all the same. Read full review

Contents

The Backgrounds and Antecedents of the British Traders
1
The London and Montreal
23
Company Men and Native Women in Hudson Bay
51
North West Company Men and Native Women
81
New Directions in Fur Trade Social Life
111
Sexual and Marital Relationships of Company
131
Fur Trade Parents and Children before 1821
153
Company Offspring in Britain
177
Fur Trade Sons and Daughters in a New Company Context
199
References
221
Index
239
Copyright

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About the author (1980)

Jennifer S.H. Brown is a Professor of History at the University of Winnipeg. She is coauthor of "The Orders of the Dreamed: George Nelson on Cree and Northern Ojibwa Religion and Myth, 1823, " and coeditor of "The New Peoples: Being and Becoming Metis in North America.

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