Patriotic Eloquence: Being Selections from One Hundred Years of National Literature (Google eBook)

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C. Scribner & Company, 1866 - Readers - 334 pages
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Contents

A Song to the tune of Hearts of Oak John Dickinson
14
Timely Warnings v Thomas Pownall
16
Rebuke of tho British Ministers Col Barri
18
First Anniversary of the Boston Massacre James Lovelt
20
The Contrast Earl of Chatham
22
Anniversary Oration Dr Joseph Warren
23
Rules for Reducing a Great Empire to a Small One Gentlemans Magazine
25
Protest against British Aggression Sons of Liberty
27
King Georges TeaParty
28
An Old Mans Advice Earl of Chatltam
31
True and False Dignity Edmund Burke
33
Great Britains Right to Tax America Edmund Burke
35
Address to the People of Great Britain Sopt 1774
36
Gen Gage and the Ministry Edmund Burke
38
Inexpediency of Maintaining Troops in Boston Earl of Chatham
39
XXVI Tribute to the Continental Congress Earl of Chatliam
41
Attitude of America towards Great Britain James Wilson
42
The Call to Arms
44
Difference between Rebellion and Revolution John Wilkes
45
Opinions of an English Traveller in America Temple LuttreU
47
Anniversary Oration Dr Joseph Warren
49
Useless Toil Lord Camden
50
The Revenue Question Edmund Burke
52
Spirit of Enterprise in New England Edmund Burke
54
Lexington Oliver Wendell Holmes
56
Address of tho Congress of Massachusetts Bay to the Inhabitants of Great Britain
58
War Inevitable Patrick Henry
60
Conflict of Duty and Inclination Earl of Effingham
62
Warrens Address before the Battle of Bunker Hill J Pierpont
64
Eulogium on Gen Joseph Warren who fell at the Battle of Bunker Hill June 17 1775
65
Bunker Hill Alfred B Street
66
Declaration of Rights by tho Continental Congress
68
Parliamentary Levity Reproved Earl of Shelburnt
70
Effects of the Policy of England John Wilkes
71
Song 1776
73
The Duties of Patriots John Rulledge
74
Funeral Oration Dr Morton
76
Instructions to Mr Ezra Sargent a Delegate to the Continental Congress by the Inhabitants of the Town of Maiden Mass
78
Song
79
Assertion of the Rights of America Riclmrd Henry Lee
80
Declaration of Independence by the United States of America in Congress Assembled Thomas Jefferson
82
LH Supposed Speech of John Adams in favor of the Declaration of Independence Daniel Webster
86
Lin War and Washington Jonathan MUchel Sewall LIV Address to the American Troops before the Battle of Long Island August 27 1776 Gen Wash...
90
Proclamation Gen Burgoyne 07
99
A Camp Ballad Francis Hopkinson
101
Charge to the Grand Jury of Kew York V John Jay
102
Barbarity of Employing Indians in War Earl of Chatham
104
Protest against Ministerial Misconduct Earl of Chatham 186
107
A Hymn William Billings
109
On the Choice of a War with America or with France Charles James Fox
110
America Lost to Great Britain John Wilkes
111
Address to the States by the Continental Congress May 26 1770
113
Eulogium on those who have Fallen in the Contest with Great Britain delivered July 5 1779 Hugh Henry Brackenridge
114
VIII
127
LXXXIII
134
LXXXVII
140
XCI
147
xcv
153
The United States Flag William Ross Wallace
238
Secession Doctrines Combated Daniel Webster
240
E Pluribus Unum John Pierpont
243
CLVTII Remonstrance against tho War with Mexico 1847Thos Corwin
244
Injustice of the War agaiust Mexico John M Berrien
246
Civil War Deprecated Henry Clay
247
Impossibility of Peaceable Secession Daniel Webster
249
Liberty Triumphant Daniel Webster
252
CLXTV A Fourth of July Address on Secession Francis Lieber
253
Elegy Thomas Buchanan Read
256
The American Sailor R F Stockton
257
Old Ironsides Oliver Wendell Holmes
258
Eighty Years Ago diaries Sprague
259
Reasons for Celebrating the Fourth of July Abraham Lincoln
260
The Fourth of July J Pierpont
261
The Crisis John Oreenleaf Whittier
262
False Prophets Emeline S Smith
264
CLXX1V Shall we givo up the Union Danie1 S Diekinson
265
A Song on our Country and her Flag Francis Lieber
266
Never or Now Oliver Wendell Holmes
268
CLXXVIL Appeal to Secessionists Daniel S Dickinson
269
Unseen Spirits
270
All of Them
271
CliXXX Stand by the Flag Joseph Holt
273
Kentucky Sophia H Oliver
275
Consequences of Secession Edward Everett
276
The Massachusetts Volunteers W S Newall
277
Marching On George W Bungay
279
Sword and Plough Cliarles Dawson Shanley
281
The Southern Confederacy if recognized becomes a Foreign Power Edward Everett
282
The whole Story told in Rhyme
283
Army Hymn Oliver Wendell Holmes
285
On Board the Cumberland March 7th 1862 George H Boker
286
TheVarnna George H Boker
289
ThanksgivingEve 1862
290
The Picket Guard
291
No Party NowAll for our Country Francis Lieber
293
The Fulfillment of Destiny Roscoe Conkling
295
The Heart of the War Dr J 67 Holland
297
Address at the Consecration of the Soldiers Cemetery at Gettys burg November 1863 Abraham Lincoln
300
Dirge for a Soldier George H Boker
301
After the Battle
302
A Thanksgiving Hymn Park Benjamin
303
have a Country
304
CCII1 Second Inaugural Address of President Lincoln March 4 1865
305
Restoration of the Flag to Fort Sumter April 14 1865
307
COV Abraham Lincoln Rev J P Thompson
308
Abraham Lincoln W C Bryant
310
Abraham Lincoln
312
CCZX Future of the Freedmen Andrew Johnson
313
Nature and Destiny of our Government
316
DialogueThe Old Continental
318
CCXIL DialogueThe Yankee Marksman William Bentley Fowle
321
GCXill DialogueImpressment of an American Seaman Epes Sargent
323
COXrV DialogueJohn Bull and Son William Bentley Fowle 829
329
Dialogue between Mr Dole Indian Commissioner and Opothley oholo and Lagarash Indian Chiefs 1862 Rebellion Record
331
Indian Names Lydia Huntley Sigourney
333

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Page 209 - UNION, strong and great! Humanity with all its fears, With all the hopes of future years, Is hanging breathless on thy fate! We know what Master laid thy keel, What Workmen wrought thy ribs of steel, Who made each mast, and sail, and rope, What anvils rang, what hammers beat, In what a forge, and what a heat Were shaped the anchors of thy hope!
Page iv - And these words, which I command thee this day, shall be in thine heart: and thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up.
Page 160 - Harmony, liberal intercourse with all nations, are recommended by policy, humanity, and interest. But even our commercial policy should hold an equal and impartial hand, neither seeking nor granting exclusive favors or preferences; consulting the natural course of things; diffusing and diversifying by gentle means the streams of commerce, but forcing nothing...
Page 160 - There can be no greater error than to expect or calculate upon real favors from nation to nation. It is an illusion which experience must cure, which a just pride ought to discard.
Page 60 - Are we disposed to be of the number of those, who, having eyes, see not, and having ears, hear not, the things which so nearly concern their temporal salvation? For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it may cost, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst, and to provide for it.
Page 160 - In offering to you, my countrymen, these counsels of an old and affectienate friend, I dare not hope they will make the strong and lasting impression I could wish ; that they will control the usual current of the passions, or prevent our nation from running the course which has hitherto marked the destiny of nations...
Page 165 - Will it be when we are totally disarmed, and when a British guard shall be stationed in every house? Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs, and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?
Page 158 - In contemplating the causes which may disturb our union, it occurs as matter of serious concern that any ground should have been furnished for characterizing parties, by geographical discriminations Northern and Southern; Atlantic and Western; whence designing men may endeavor to excite a belief that there is a real difference of local interests and views.
Page 85 - ... free and independent states ; that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British crown, and that all political connexion between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved ; and that as free and independent states, .they have full power to levy war, conclude peace, contract alliances, establish commerce, and do all other acts and things which independent states may of right do.
Page 54 - Magnanimity in politics is not seldom the truest wisdom; and a great empire and little minds go ill together.

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