Open Closed Open: Poems

Front Cover
Harcourt, 2000 - Poetry - 184 pages
5 Reviews
Amichai writes of the language of love, and tea with roasted almonds, of desire and love. Of a Jewish cemetery whose groundskeeper is an expert on flowers and seasons of the year, but no expert on buried Jews; of Russian shirts embroidered in the colors of love and death; of Jerusalem, the city where everything sails: the flags, the prayer shawls, the caftans, the monks' robes, the kaffiyehs, and young women's dresses. The poet tenderly, mischievously, breaks open the grand diction of the revered Jewish verses and supplications and suddenly discovers the light that his own experience casts upon them. Here, the bread of memory and the circuses of forgetting, nostalgia for God and a better world, dust and heat, and tamarisk trees that stand as flight attendants for the next millennium, saying, "You can still get a seat on the third millennium before liftoff." Open Closed Open-poems at once meditative and playful, anxious and full of hope, sung in a language of biblical directness and meaning, that through the microcosm of the everyday give us the gift of the world at large.

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Review: Open Closed Open

User Review  - Courtney Anthony - Goodreads

Exquisite. "I Foretell the Days of Yore" is my personal favorite. Someday I want to be able to read these in the original Hebrew. Read full review

Review: Open Closed Open

User Review  - Seth the Zest - Goodreads

I found most of the poems to have flat language that calls little attention to itself. Repeated lines like "What remains? The suitcase in top of the closer,/ that's what remains." offer moderately ... Read full review

Contents

CONTENTS
1
Notes
174
Acknowledgments
183
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

YEHUDA AMICHAI (1924-2000) has long been considered one of the great poets of the twentieth century. He was the recipient of numerous awards, including the Israel Prize, his country's highest honor. His work has been translated into more than thirty-seven languages. Winner of the PEN Award for Poetry in Translation

CHANA BLOCH, author of three books of poems, is co-translator of the Song of Songs and books by Amichai and Dahlia Ravikovitch. She lives in California.CHANA KRONFELD is professor of Hebrew, Yiddish, and comparative literature at the University of California, Berkeley. She lives in California.Winner of the PEN Award for Poetry in Translation

Chana Kronfeld is Associate Professor of Hebrew and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Berkeley. She is the coeditor of "David Fogel: The Emergence of Hebrew Modernism" (1993).

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