Personal Memoirs of General W. T. Sherman, Volume 2

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Digital Scanning, 1999 - Biography & Autobiography - 636 pages
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He never commanded in a major Union victory and his military career had repeated ups and downs, but William Tecumseh Sherman is the second best known of Northern commanders. His father died when he was nine years old, and Sherman was raised by Senator Thomas Ewing and eventually married into the family. Through the influence of his patron, he obtained an appointment to West Point. Only five cadets of the class of 1840 graduated ahead of him, and he was appointed to the artillery.

Sherman was then appointed to the colonelcy of an infantry regiment. He led a brigade of volunteers which crossed Bull Run and was named a brigadier general the next month. He was then sent to Kentucky as deputy to Robert Anderson and soon succeeded the hero of Fort Sumter in command of the department. During the campaign against Forts Henry and Donelson he was charged with forwarding reinforcements to Grant. Forming a good working relationship with the future commander-in-chief, Sherman waiveed his seniority rights and took a command under him. Praised by Grant, he was soon made a major general of volunteers. He was instrumental in persuading Grant to remain in the army during his difficulties with Halleck during the advance on Corinth, Mississippi.

Following the fall of the river city Sherman was named a brigadier general and led expeditions against Jackson and Meridian, succeeding Grant in overall command in the West. Facing Johnston's army, he forced it all the way back to Atlanta where the Confederate was replaced by Hood who launched three disastrous attacks against Union troops near the city. Eventually taking possession of Atlanta, Sherman ordered the population evacuated and the military value ofthe city destroyed. Sending George H. Thomas back to Tennessee to deal with Hood, he embarked on his March to the Sea. Taking Savannah, he announced the city as a Christmas gift to the president and the country.

On August 12, 1864, Sherman had been promoted to major general in the reg

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About the author (1999)

William Tecumseh Sherman (1820-1891) was an American soldier, businessman, educator and author. He served as a General in the Union Army during the American Civil War (1861-65), for which he received recognition for his outstanding command of military strategy as well as criticism for the harshness of the "scorched earth" policies that he implemented in conducting total war against the Confederate States. Military historian B. H. Liddell Hart famously declared that Sherman was "the first modern general." Sherman served under General Ulysses S. Grant in 1862 and 1863 during the campaigns that led to the fall of the Confederate stronghold of Vicksburg on the Mississippi River and culminated with the routing of the Confederate armies in the state of Tennessee. In 1864, Sherman succeeded Grant as the Union commander in the western theater of the war. He proceeded to lead his troops to the capture of the city of Atlanta, a military success that contributed to the re-election of President Abraham Lincoln. Sherman's subsequent march through Georgia and the Carolinas further undermined the Confederacy's ability to continue fighting. He accepted the surrender of all the Confederate armies in the Carolinas, Georgia, and Florida in April 1865. When Grant assumed the U.S. presidency in 1869, Sherman succeeded him as Commanding General of the Army (1869-83). As such, he was responsible for the U.S. Army conduct in the Indian Wars over the next 15 years, in the western United States. He steadfastly refused to be drawn into politics and in 1875 published his Memoirs, one of the best-known firsthand accounts of the Civil War.

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