Hubbert's Peak: The Impending World Oil Shortage (New Edition)

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Princeton University Press, Oct 19, 2008 - Nature - 208 pages
6 Reviews

In 2001, Kenneth Deffeyes made a grim prediction: world oil production would reach a peak within the next decade--and there was nothing anyone could do to stop it. Deffeyes's claim echoed the work of geophysicist M. King Hubbert, who in 1956 predicted that U.S. oil production would reach its highest level in the early 1970s. Though roundly criticized by oil experts and economists, Hubbert's prediction came true in 1970.

In this updated edition of Hubbert's Peak, Deffeyes explains the crisis that few now deny we are headed toward. Using geology and economics, he shows how everything from the rising price of groceries to the subprime mortgage crisis has been exacerbated by the shrinking supply--and growing price--of oil. Although there is no easy solution to these problems, Deffeyes argues that the first step is understanding the trouble that we are in.

  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - silpol - LibraryThing

Comprehensive and detailed, sometimes even down to industry anecdotes, it reviews oil and adjacent fossil fuel areas in historical and industry segment perspectives. With numerous illustrations ... Read full review

Review: Hubbert's Peak: The Impending World Oil Shortage

User Review  - Chris - Goodreads

An interesting book and great that it is written by a geologist, but I found his writing style to be overly colloquial in a very forced way. Also, in light of recent developments some of his conclusions don't hold as much weight as they probably did when this was written 10 years ago. Read full review

Contents

Overview
1
The Origin of Oil
14
Oil Reservoirs and Oil Traps
40
Finding It
70
Drilling Methods
88
Size and Discoverability of Oil Fields
113
Hubbert Revisited
133
Rate Plots
150
The Future of Fossil Fuels
159
Alternative Energy Sources
176
A New Outlook
186
Notes
191
Index
205
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Kenneth S. Deffeyes is professor emeritus at Princeton University. Prior to teaching, he worked alongside M. King Hubbert at the Shell Oil research laboratory in Houston.

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