A Universal Pronouncing Gazetteer: Containing Topographical, Statistical, and Other Information, of All the More Important Places in the Known World, from the Most Recent and Authentic Sources (Google eBook)

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Lindsay & Blakiston, 1847 - Geography - 630 pages
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Page 645 - Croix ; thence down the main channel of said river to the Mississippi ; thence down the centre of the main channel of that river to the northwest corner of the State of Illinois...
Page 435 - Indian, who, in pursuit of a llama up the steep, to save himself from falling caught hold of a shrub, which being torn from the soil exposed a mass of solid silver at the roots; it was that mountain, incapable of producing even a blade of grass, which yet...
Page 404 - Columbia, and thence down the said main stream to the Ocean, with free access into and through the said River or Rivers, it being understood that all the usual portages along the line thus described shall in like manner be free and...
Page 451 - But thou, of temples old, or altars new, Standest alone, with nothing like to thee — Worthiest of God, the holy and the true. Since Zion's desolation, when that He Forsook his former city, what could be, Of earthly structures, in his honour piled, Of a sublimer aspect? Majesty, Power, Glory, Strength, and Beauty all are aisled In this eternal ark of worship undefiled.
Page 165 - N. Lat., and 71° 55' and 73° 50' W. Lon. ; bounded on the N. by Massachusetts, E. by Rhode Island, S. by Long Island Sound, and W. by New York; and divided into 8 counties.* Its length, from E.
Page 64 - ALGIERS, a celebrated city, and cap. of the country of the same name, is situated on the coast of the Mediterranean, upon the declivity of a hill, on which the houses rise gradually in the form of an amphitheatre, and terminate nearly in a point at the summit. It is not above a mile and a half in circuit. The largest street is said to be 1200 paces long, and not more than 12 feet wide. The population, previous to the French conquest, had been variously estimated, from 80,000 to 200,000, and even...
Page 22 - Oh never talk again to me Of northern climes and British ladies ; It has not been your lot to see, Like me, the lovely girl of Cadiz. Although her eye be not of blue, Nor fair her locks, like English lasses, How far its own expressive hue The languid azure eye surpasses ! 2.
Page 33 - XIX. 1. A, in French, is generally considered to have two sounds ; the first long, as in the English word far, eg in pas ; the second short, almost like a in fat, eg in bal.
Page 229 - ... wherein affairs are finally decided. The object of the Germanic Confederation and the duties of the Federative diet are— the maintenance of external security or mutual defence from a common enemy, and the preservation of internal peace among the Federative states, which have no right to declare war on each other, but must submit their differences to the decision of the diet. The maintenance of internal security comprehends not only the prevention of...
Page 236 - W. Lon.); others make Cape Apollonia the western boundary. Of all parts of Guinea, and indeed of the African coast, this is the one where European settlements and trade have been carried to the greatest extent Its name sufficiently indicates the cause. It appears, however, that the gold for which this region formerly enjoyed an exaggerated celebrity, was chiefly procured from other portions of Africa. GOLNOW, gol'-nov, a t. of Prussia, in Pomerania, 18m. NE of Stettin. Pop. 3,600. (B.) GOM-BROON',...

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