Search and Destroy: African-American Males in the Criminal Justice System

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 26, 1996 - Social Science - 324 pages
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The war on drugs, begun in the Reagan Administration and presently continuing unabated, has resulted in an explosion in the American prison population. Whether a desired effect of the war or not, this increase has been accounted for by a severely disproportionate number of African American males. Jerome Miller demonstrates in Search and Destroy that an African American male between the ages of eighteen and thirty-five has an inordinate likelihood of encountering the criminal justice system at some point during those years. In a wide-ranging survey of blacks and the justice system, Miller notes the presence of bias among police officers, probation officers, courts, and even social scientists whose data form the basis for many policies and social workers whose responsibility is allegedly to members of the underclass.

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Search and destroy: African-American males and the criminal justice system

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The title of this volume is a military term that means "find the enemy and eliminate it." This is exactly what Miller, cofounder of the National Center on Institutions and Alternatives, says the ... Read full review

About the author (1996)

Dr Jerrry Miller holds a Doctor of Social Work degree from the Catholic University of America. In 1968, he became Associate Professor of Social Work at Ohio State University. He was subsequently appointed to the cabinet of Massachusetts Republican Governor Frank Sargent in 1969 to head the newly created Massachusetts Department of Youth Services and has also served on the gubernatorial staff of Milton Shapp, former governor of Pennsylvania. In 1977, he founded the National Center on Institutions and Alternatives (NCIA), a non-profit organization to set up alternative plans for youth and adults otherwise institutionalized in reform schools, prisons, mental hospitals and state institutions for the developmentally disabled. He has been consultant to the U.S. Justice Department, evaluating juvenile and adult institutions in more than 30 states, and has served as a special master for a number of federal judges. He has assisted in developing mitigative studies for individuals on death row in numerous states. He continues to see individuals clinically and is presently finishing a manuscript on the issue of sex offenders in our society and the 'moral panic' in which modern industrial societies are caught up. His articles dealing with the topics of this book have appeared in the Los Angeles Times, the New York Times and the Washington Post.

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