De Humani Corporis Fabrica

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Norman Publishing, Jan 1, 1998 - Science - 416 pages
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This is the first English translation of Vesalius's "De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem", first published in 1543 which inaugurated a revolution in anatomical research.
  

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great, very intrestting

Contents

Historical Preface
ix
Translators Preface
xxii
Anatomists Preface
xxxv
Notes to the Reader
xlii
Publishers Note to the Reader Iviii
lviii
The Nature and Function of Bone
1
Its Nature Function and Differentiation
8
The Mutual Interconnection and Juncture of Bones
28
The Ulna and Radius
254
The Carpus
271
The Bones of the Metacarpus
282
The Fingers
286
Sesamoid Bones
297
The Bones Joined to Either Side of the Sacrum
301
The Femur
314
Tibia and Fibula
322

Why the Head is So ShapedThe Number of Different Shapes
45
The Zygoma And the Bones Resembling a Rocky Outcrop
80
The Twelve Bones of the Upper Jaw Including the Nasal Bones
89
The Foramina in the Bones of the Head and Upper Jaw 1 1 6
116
The Hyoid Bone
132
The Cervical Vertebrae
144
The Thoracic Vertebrae
170
The Lumbar Vertebrae
183
Sacrum and Coccyx
188
The Bones of the Thorax
202
The Cartilaginous Substance Said to Exist in the Base of the Heart Otherwise Known as the Heart Bone
219
The Scapula
222
The Clavicles
238
The Bone of the Arm or Humerus
244
The Patella
335
The Bones of the Foot
342
The Nails
355
The Cartilages of the Eyelids
357
The Cartilage of the Ear
358
The Cartilages of the Nose
359
The Cartilages of the Rough Artery The Parts within It Known to the Greeks as the Glottis and Epiglottis
361
How the Bones and Cartilages of the Human Body are Prepared for Study
370
The Number of the Bones
385
Index to Text
399
Index to People and Places
408
Index to Words from Other Languages
410
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Born in Brussels, Belgium, Andreas Vesalius was a Flemish anatomist whose sixteenth-century work, De humani corporis fabrica, is widely considered one of the most influential medical books. Educated at the University of Louvain, Vesalius chose the University of Paris for his medical training, where he became interested in anatomy and acquired his skills at dissection, both in the tradition of Galen. He left Paris and completed his education in 1537 at the University of Padua, then the most famous college in Europe. In Padua, Vesalius published a dissection manual for his students and continued to refine his dissection techniques and to expand his knowledge of human anatomy, mainly by dissecting cadavers. He also began to note discrepancies between his observations and what was then published about human anatomy, based on Galen's work in the second century. In 1540 Vesalius began developing the Fabrica, as it is called, which took nearly three years. He supervised all aspects of the making of the book and its publication in 1543, giving the world the finest elucidation of anatomy to that date. It proved that much of Galenic anatomy was based on inaccurate assumptions, thus altering the study of medicine profoundly. The exquisite illustrations, drawn by artists in Titian's Venetian studio, are so outstanding that they are important as art and as science. Several supplements to the original and a second edition of this great anatomical treatise were published in Vesalius's lifetime. Surprisingly, he gave up his anatomical studies and became a court physician to Emperor Charles V and later to Philip II of Spain, at whose court he remained until his death.