Tao Te Ching: The New Translation from Tao Te Ching: the Definitive Edition

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Penguin, 2008 - Philosophy - 103 pages
10 Reviews
In the hands of Jonathan Star, the eighty-one verses of the Tao Te Ching resound with the elegant, simple images and all-penetrating ideas that have made this ancient work a keystone of the world's wisdom literature.
In his critically acclaimed guidebook, Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition, translator-scholar Star provided a comprehensive codex to the ancient Chinese masterpiece - as well as a fresh literary translation, which, of its own accord, became a favorite among readers and teachers.  Now, in this concise volume, readers can discover Star's literary adaptation on its own, and find in it a foundation of wisdom to turn to again and again.
'It would be hard to find a fresh approach to a text that ranks only behind the Bible as the most widely translated book in the world, but Star achieves that goal.' Napra ReView
Jonathan Star has been widely acclaimed for his translations of Rumi, Hafez, the poet-saints of India, and the Christian mystics.  He is the author of the celebrated Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition, Rumi: In the Arms of the Beloved, and other books.  Star live in upstate New York.
Introduction by August Gold
  

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Review: Tao Te Ching: The New Translation from Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition (L'esprit des races jaunes #2)

User Review  - Kara - Goodreads

It's a simple translation but not ideal for a beginner trying to understand the Tao Te Ching. I'd recommend a version that includes explanations. Read full review

Review: Tao Te Ching: The New Translation from Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition (L'esprit des races jaunes #2)

User Review  - Robin - Goodreads

This is the first edition of Tao Te Ching I read. It is a wonderful translation. I find comparing translations adds more flavor to the meaning I draw from The Tao. Read full review

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About the author (2008)

Lao Tzu, Chinese philosopher, was a native of Chu, a southern state during the Zhou dynasty. His birth and death dates are uncertain. He is considered to be the founder of Taoism. According to legend, Lao Tzu set out on a journey to leave China. At the border, he was asked by a border guard to record his teachings. These teachings were compiled into what we know as the Tao-te-Ching, translated as the Classic of the Way and Virtue.

Star graduated with honors from Harvard University, where he studied Eastern religion and architecture. For the past fifteen years he has pursued spiritual practice, both Zen Meditation and Yogic disciplines.

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