Nicomachean Ethics (Second Edition)

Front Cover
Hackett Publishing, Mar 10, 2000 - Philosophy - 392 pages
11 Reviews
Building on the strengths of the first edition, the second edition of the Irwin Nicomachean Ethics features a revised translation (with little editorial intervention), expanded notes (including a summary of the argument of each chapter), an expanded Introduction, and a revised glossary.
  

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User Review  - LisaMaria_C - LibraryThing

Plato and Aristotle between them not only laid the foundations for Western philosophy, many would argue they divided it neatly between them: Plato the one who with his "Allegory of the Cave" gave ... Read full review

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User Review  - booksontrial - LibraryThing

Aristotle vs. Plato Having just finished and enjoyed Plato's complete works, I find this book a bit annoying and uninspiring in comparison. Aristotle seems to take every opportunity to "correct" Plato ... Read full review

Contents

Nicomachean Ethics
1
3 The Method of Political Science
2
4 Common Beliefs
3
5 The Three Lives
4
6 The Platonic Form of the Good
5
7 An Account of the Human Good
7
8 Defense of the Account of the Good
10
9 How Is Happiness Achieved?
12
9 Good Deliberation
93
10 Comprehension
95
12 Puzzles about Prudence and Wisdom
96
13 Prudence and Virtue of Character
98
Incontinence
99
2 Puzzles about Incontinence
100
3 Incontinence and Ignorance
102
4 Simple Incontinence
104

10 Can We Be Happy during Our Lifetime?
13
11 How Happiness Can Be Affected after Ones Death
15
13 Introduction to the Virtues
16
Virtue of Character
18
2 Habituation
19
3 The Importance of Pleasure and Pain
20
4 Virtuous Actions versus Virtuous Character
22
Its Genus
23
7 The Particular Virtues of Character
25
8 Relations between Mean and Extreme States
27
9 How Can We Reach the Mean?
29
Preconditions of Virtue
30
2 Decision
33
3 Deliberation
34
4 Wish
36
5 Virtue and Vice Are in Our Power
37
The Individual Virtues of Character
40
7 Bravery Its Characteristic Outlook
41
8 Conditions That Resemble Bravery
42
9 Feelings Proper to Bravery
44
10 Temperance Its Scope
45
11 Temperance Its Outlook
47
12 Intemperance
48
2 Magnificence
53
3 Magnanimity
56
4 The Virtue Concerned with Small Honors
60
5 Mildness
61
6 Friendliness
62
7 Truthfulness
63
8 Wit
65
9 Shame
66
Justice
67
2 Special Justice Contrasted with General
69
3 Justice in Distribution
71
4 Justice in Rectification
72
5 Justice in Exchange
74
6 Political Justice
77
7 Justice by Nature and by Law
78
8 Justice Injustice and the Voluntary
79
9 Puzzles about Justice and Injustice
80
10 Decency
83
11 Injustice to Oneself
84
Virtues of Thought
86
2 Thought Desire and Decision
87
4 Craft Knowledge
88
5 Prudence
89
6 Understanding
90
8 Types of Prudence
92
5 Bestiality and Disease
106
6 Incontinence and Related Conditions
107
7 Incontinence Intemperance and Softness
109
8 Why Intemperance is Worse than Incontinence
110
9 Continence
111
10 Answers to Further Questions about Incontinence
113
Pleasure
114
12 Pleasure and Good
115
13 Pleasure and Happiness
116
14 Bodily Pleasures
117
FRIENDSHIP
119
2 The Object of Friendship
120
3 The Three Types of Friendship
121
4 Comparison between the Types of Friendship
123
5 State and Activity in Friendship
124
6 Activities Characteristic of the Different Types of Friendship
125
7 Friendship between Unequals
127
8 Giving and Receiving in Friendship
128
9 Friendship in Communities
129
10 Political Systems
130
11 Friendships in Political Systems
131
12 Friendships in Families
132
13 Disputes in Friendships between Equals
134
14 Disputes in Friendships between Unequals
136
2 Conflicts between Different Types of Friendships
139
3 Dissolution of Friendships
140
4 Selflove and Friendship
141
5 Goodwill and Friendship
143
6 Friendship and Concord
144
7 Active Benevolence and Friendship
145
8 Selflove and Selfishness
146
9 Why Are Friends Needed?
148
10 How Many Friends Are Needed?
150
11 Friends in Good and Ill Fortune
151
12 Shared Activity in Friendship
152
PLEASURE
153
2 Arguments about Pleasure
154
3 Pleasure Is a Good but Not the Good
155
4 Pleasure Is an Activity
157
5 Pleasures Differ in Kind
159
Further Discussion
162
7 Happiness and Theoretical Study
163
8 Theoretical Study and the Other Virtues
165
From Ethics to Politics
167
Notes
172
Glossary
315
Further Reading
355
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

Morality and the Emotions
Justin Oakley
No preview available - 1993
Morality and the Emotions
Justin Oakley
No preview available - 1993
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About the author (2000)

Terence Irwin is Professor of Ancient Philosophy in the University of Oxford, and Fellow of Keble College.

Bibliographic information