Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 1 - 7 of 7 on THE author's object in this work, was to place before the reader a constant succession....  
" THE author's object in this work, was to place before the reader a constant succession of characters and incidents ; to paint them in as vivid colours as he could command ; and to render them, at the same time, life-like and amusing. "
The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club - Page xxxix
edited by - 1886
Full view - About this book

The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, Volume 1

Charles Dickens - England - 1838
...NEW-YORK: WM. H. COLTER, 104 BEEKMAN-STREET. 2-14 PREFACE. THE author's object in this work, was to plase before the reader a constant succession of characters...others in the outset of the undertaking, he adopted th. machinery of the club, which was suggested as that best adapted to his purpose : but, finding that...
Full view - About this book

The Novels and Tales of Charles Dickens, (Boz.).

Charles Dickens - Fiction - 1849
...faithfully and sincerely yours, CHARLES DICKEN& 48 DOUGHTY STREET, Su ITEM HE it 27, I837. PREFACE. TRE author's object in this work, was to place before...of the undertaking, he adopted the machinery of the cluh, which was suggested as that best adapted to his purpose : but, finding that it tended rather...
Full view - About this book

The life and writings of Charles Dickens ...

R. A. Hammond - Literary Criticism - 1871 - 426 pages
...continuous tale, as we have elsewhere more fully explained. The original design, as the author tells us, was " to place before the reader a constant succession...characters and incidents ; to paint them in as vivid colors as he could command ; and to render them, at the same time, life-like and amusing."The dedication...
Full view - About this book

Pickwick Papers, Volume 1

Charles Dickens - 1908
...contributions to a new volume of "Sketches." The object of the work, at first, was simply to amuse, by placing before the reader " a constant succession of characters...incidents; to paint them in as vivid colours as he" [the author] "could command; and to render them, at the same time, lifelike and amusing." The cumbrous...
Full view - About this book

The Lawyer in Literature

John Marshall Gest - Law and literature - 1913 - 249 pages
...before the reader a constant succession of characters and incidents; to paint them in as vivid colors as he could command, and to render them at the same time lifelike and amusing." There is no more plot in Pickwick than there is in an omelette; yet, allowing for exaggeration and...
Full view - About this book

The Marriage of Minds: Reading Sympathy in the Victorian Marriage Plot

Rachel Ablow - Literary Criticism - 2007 - 231 pages
...Pickwick Papers (1837), for example, the novelist describes himself as an entertainer whose object "was to place before the reader a constant succession of characters and incidents . . . and to render them . . . lifelike and amusing."18 In the preface to Nicholas Nickleby (1839),...
Limited preview - About this book

LIFE OF CHARLES DICKENS.

R. SHELTON MACKENZIE, LL.D. - 1870
...from lip or pen could ever afford." In the Preface, of 1837, Dickens said that his original purpose "was to place before the reader a constant succession...characters and incidents ; to paint them in as vivid colors as he could command ; and to render them, at the same time, life-like and amusing." He added...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF