Redeemer Nation: The Idea of America's Millennial Role, Volume 2

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University of Chicago Press, 1968 - History - 238 pages
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Ernest Tuveson here shows that the idea of the redemptive mission which has motivated so much of the United States foreign policy is as old as the Republic itself. He traces the development of this element of the American heritage from its beginning as a literal interpretation of biblical prophecies. Pointing to the application of the millenarian ideal to successive stages of American history, notably apocalyptic events like the Civil War, Tuveson illustrates its pervasive cultural influences with examples from the writings of Jonathan Edwards, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Timothy Dwight, and Julia Ward Howe, among others.
  

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Contents

Apocalyptic and History
1
The Rationale of the Millennium
26
The Politics of Providence and the Holy Utopia
52
When Did Destiny Become Manifest?
91
Chosen RaceChosen People
137
The Ennobling War
187
A Connecticut Yankee in the Mystical Babylon
215
Bibliographical Note
232
Index
235
Copyright

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