The Penny cyclopędia of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge (Google eBook)

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C. Knight, 1842 - Reference
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OCLC: 2041456
Related Subjects: Encyclopedias and dictionaries.
LCCN:AE

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Page 109 - Every tax ought to be so contrived as both to take out and to keep out of the pockets of the people as Little as possible, over and above what it brings into the public treasury of the state.
Page 192 - Tenant at will is, where lands or tenements are let by one man to another, to have and to hold to him at the will of the lessor", by force of which lease the lessee is in possession.
Page 109 - The subjects of every state ought to contribute towards the support of the government, as nearly as possible, in proportion to their respective abilities ; that is, in proportion to the revenue which they respectively enjoy under the protection of the state.
Page 190 - ... by parol, and not put in writing, and signed by the parties so making or creating the same, or their agents thereunto lawfully authorized by writing, shall have the force and effect of leases or estates at will only...
Page 97 - All the objects which are exhibited to our view by nature, upon close examination will be found to have their blemishes and defects. The most beautiful forms have something about them like weakness, minuteness, or imperfection. But it is not every eye that perceives these blemishes. It must be an eye long used to the contemplation and comparison of these forms; and which, by a long habit of observing what any set of objects of the same kind have in common, has acquired the power of discerning what...
Page 109 - The tax which each individual is bound to pay ought to be certain, and not arbitrary. The time of payment, the manner of payment, the quantity to be paid, ought all to be clear and plain to the contributor, and to every other person.
Page 190 - Except nevertheless all leases not exceeding the term of three years from the making thereof, whereupon the rent reserved to the landlord, during such term, shall amount unto two third parts at the least of the full improved value of the thing demised.
Page 117 - And this your heave offering shall be reckoned unto you, as though it were the corn of the threshingfloor, and as the fulness of the winepress.
Page 202 - Tenement is a word of still greater extent, and though in its vulgar acceptation it is only applied to houses and other buildings, yet in its original, proper, and legal sense it signifies everything that may be holden, provided it be of a permanent nature ; whether it be of a substantial and sensible, or of an unsubstantial, ideal kind.
Page 97 - ... yet the highest perfection of the human figure is not to be found in any one of them. It is not in the Hercules...

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