The Mysteries of Trade: Or, The Source of Great Wealth, Containing Receipts and Patents in Chemistry and Manufacturing : with Practical Observations on the Useful Arts : Original and Compiled (Google eBook)

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author, 1825 - Chemistry, Technical - 152 pages
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Page 2 - District Clerk's Office. BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the ninth day of June, AD 1829, in the fifty-third year of the Independence of the United States of America, Alden Bradford, of the said District, has deposited in this Office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as author, in the words following, to wit : " History of Massachusetts, from the year 1790, to 1820.
Page 63 - This large stock of small wines, with which they are almost overrun in France, sufficiently accounts for their making such vast quantities of brandy in that country, more than in others which lie in warmer climates, and are much better adapted to the production of grapes. Nor is this the only...
Page 130 - ... till the fine white particles of the potatoes are precipitated ; then pour the mucilaginous liquor from the fecula, and preserve the liquor for use. The article to be cleaned should then be laid upon a linen cloth on a table, and having provided a clean sponge, dip the sponge...
Page 133 - ... or still better, on the second day, a second coat of ochre and black (without any, or but a very small portion of soap) is laid...
Page 131 - The coarse pulp, which does not pass the sieve, is of great use in cleaning worsted curtains, tapestry, carpets, or other coarse goods. The mucilaginous liquor will clean all sorts of silk, cotton, or woollen goods, without hurting or spoiling the colour; it may be also used in cleaning oil paintings, or furniture that is soiled.
Page 88 - To fifteen quarts of water put six pounds of brown sugar; let it boil ten minutes, and take off the scum : pour on it half a peck of primroses ; before it is quite cold put in a little fresh yeast, and let it work in a. warm place...
Page 89 - ... combs and two of water : place them in the sun, if his rays possess a sufficient power, or in a warm place, and cover them with cloths. Fermentation takes place in a few days, and continues from eight to twelve days, according to the higher or lower temperature of the situation in which the operation is performed. During the fermentation, stir the...
Page 32 - Take gooseberries before they are ripe, crush them with a mallet in a wooden bowl, and to every gallon of fruit put a gallon of water ; let it stand two days, stirring it well ; squeeze the mixture well with your hands through a...
Page 14 - ... are very shallow. Liquor made from pale malt, and which is intended for immediate drinking, need not be cooled lower than 75 or 80 degrees; of course this kind of beer may be brewed in the hottest weather ; but beer brewed from brown malt, and intended to be kept, must be cooled to 65 or 70 before it is put into a state of fermentation. Hence...
Page 45 - Wine. To every gallon of ripe grapes put a gallon of soft water, bruise the grapes, let them stand a. week without stirring, and draw the liquor off fine ; to every gallon of wine put three pounds of lump sugar ; put...

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