Twilight of Idols and Anti-Christ

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Penguin Books Limited, Jan 25, 1990 - Philosophy - 207 pages
74 Reviews
'Twilight of the Idols', an attack on all the prevalent ideas of his time, offers a lightning tour of his whole philosophy. It also prepares the way for 'The Anti-Christ', a final assault on institutional Christianity. Both works show Nietzsche lashing out at self-deception, astounded at how often morality is based on vengefulness and resentment. Both reveal a profound understanding of human mean-spiritedness which still cannot destroy the underlying optimism of Nietzsche, the supreme affirmer among the great philosophers.

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Review: Twilight of the Idols/The Anti-Christ

User Review  - Fee - Goodreads

Every star I gave this book is a star I thought was closer sending me to hell. Nietzsche gives many explanations and opposed beliefs towards Christianity. He called all priests liars and the whole ... Read full review

Review: Twilight of the Idols/The Anti-Christ

User Review  - Gavin Breeden - Goodreads

What an interesting book. During the final sane year of his life -- before he suffered a complete mental breakdown, which ended his writing -- Nietzsche wrote two final short works which are combined ... Read full review

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About the author (1990)

The philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche was born in Prussia in 1844. After the death of his father, a Lutheran minister, Nietzsche was raised from the age of five by his mother in a household of women. In 1869 he was appointed Professor of Classical Philology at the University of Basel, where he taught until 1879 when poor health forced him to retire. He never recovered from a nervous breakdown in 1889 and died eleven years later. Known for saying that "god is dead," Nietzsche propounded his metaphysical construct of the superiority of the disciplined individual (superman) living in the present over traditional values derived from Christianity and its emphasis on heavenly rewards. His ideas were appropriated by the Fascists, who turned his theories into social realities that he had never intended.
R. J. Hollingdale has translated eleven of Nietzsche's books and published two books about him. He has also translated works by, among others, Schopenhauer, Goethe, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Lichtenberg and Theodor Fontane, many of these for the Penguin Classics. He is Honorary President of the British Nietzsche Society, and was for the Australian academic year 1991 Visiting Fellow at Trinity College, Melbourne.

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