Torture and Democracy (Google eBook)

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Princeton University Press, Jun 8, 2009 - Political Science - 880 pages
9 Reviews

This is the most comprehensive, and most comprehensively chilling, study of modern torture yet written. Darius Rejali, one of the world's leading experts on torture, takes the reader from the late nineteenth century to the aftermath of Abu Ghraib, from slavery and the electric chair to electrotorture in American inner cities, and from French and British colonial prison cells and the Spanish-American War to the fields of Vietnam, the wars of the Middle East, and the new democracies of Latin America and Europe.

As Rejali traces the development and application of one torture technique after another in these settings, he reaches startling conclusions. As the twentieth century progressed, he argues, democracies not only tortured, but set the international pace for torture. Dictatorships may have tortured more, and more indiscriminately, but the United States, Britain, and France pioneered and exported techniques that have become the lingua franca of modern torture: methods that leave no marks. Under the watchful eyes of reporters and human rights activists, low-level authorities in the world's oldest democracies were the first to learn that to scar a victim was to advertise iniquity and invite scandal. Long before the CIA even existed, police and soldiers turned instead to "clean" techniques, such as torture by electricity, ice, water, noise, drugs, and stress positions. As democracy and human rights spread after World War II, so too did these methods.

Rejali makes this troubling case in fluid, arresting prose and on the basis of unprecedented research--conducted in multiple languages and on several continents--begun years before most of us had ever heard of Osama bin Laden or Abu Ghraib. The author of a major study of Iranian torture, Rejali also tackles the controversial question of whether torture really works, answering the new apologists for torture point by point. A brave and disturbing book, this is the benchmark against which all future studies of modern torture will be measured.

  

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Review: Torture and Democracy

User Review  - Naomi - Goodreads

Powerful study of how and why democracies use torture (typically, what Rejali calls "clean" or the type that does not leave obvious long-lasting physical marks) and continuing to challenge the ... Read full review

Review: Torture and Democracy

User Review  - Ilya - Goodreads

Torture, or inflicting severe physical or mental pain and suffering on a person, is older than civilization. It has been used for enforcing the social hierarchy, for example, between the slaves and ... Read full review

Contents

Forced Standing and Other Positions
316
Fists and Exercises
334
Old and New Restraints
347
Noise
360
Drugs and Doctors
385
Supply and Demand for Clean Torture 405
404
Does Torture Work?
446
What the Apologists Say
480

Shock
123
Magnetos
144
Currents
167
Singing the World Electric
190
Prods Tasers and Stun Guns
225
Introduction 261
260
Sticks and Bones
269
Water Sleep and Spice
279
Stress and Duress
294
Why Governments Dont Learn
519
The Great Age of Torture in Modern Memory
537
Appendixes
553
the Vietnam War
581
Notes 593
592
Selected Bibliography
781
Index
819
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Darius Rejali is professor of political science at Reed College and an internationally recognized expert on modern torture. He is the author of "Torture and Modernity: Self, Society, and State in Modern Iran.