The Stefánsson-Anderson Arctic Expedition of the American Museum: Preliminary Ethnological Report, Volume 14, Issues 1-2 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
order of the Trustees, 1914 - Eskimos - 395 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents


Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 214 - Pannigabluk herself has had a fatherless birth— an abortion at Oliktok last spring when she was on her way west with Billy and Anderson. The fetus was about three inches long. She had never had connection with a man since the death of her first (only) husband— a full year previous the abortion.9 Again, Anderson is around, although he often travelled independently of Stefansson and Pannigabluk, looking for zoological specimens.
Page 357 - ... goes to sea and seeks his double the arlu. Here Mamayauk's knowledge becomes vague. Thus much she has heard, but she does not know if the wolf remains at sea as a wolf, if it merges with its double and they become one, or if it becomes an arlu, so that there are now two arlus, the one that was always at sea, and the other driven there by hunger. — Guninana says the above must be information from Western sources. She knows, too, that arlus are the ta-tkoks of wolves ; she always supposed that...
Page 213 - Pan. says Eskimo women frequently have children that have no father - sometimes they die at or before birth, sometimes they live. When they live they do not differ noticeably from people that have fathers. Some women are afraid of these fatherless children and kill them at birth...
Page 226 - Pannigabluk will clean dog excrement off a sole of a pair of boots with her ulu, wipe it casually with a rag that may have had as bad uses a dozen times before, and then proceed to eat with the ulu or cut up with it food for cooking. She will not use the same spoon twice in a half hour to stir her own tea without wiping it between times with the same rag, if it so falls, with which she has just wiped the ulu. Most of the Eskimo I know will pick up and eat without concern a piece of blubber, cooked...
Page 319 - People say that wolves and arlut are avariksut ("chips of the same block"), equivalent, alike, equal. When wolves starve on land they go to their relatives in the sea and turn arlut; likewise the arlut when unable to find food in the sea go inland and become wolves.
Page 128 - When the spirit informs the medicineman that the woman has done this, he calls upon her to confess that she has done it. If she confesses the famine will end and all will be well, but if she brazenly asserts that she has done no such things as charged with, then the most serious misfortunes will continue to fall upon the people. A person who stubbornly refuses to confess is therefore a public enemy and will be treated accordingly. In extreme cases it may become necessary to kill a person who is incorrigible....
Page 312 - half of an unbaked clay lamp, which fell to pieces when touched". One of Stefansson's Eskimos, who was from Kotzebue Sound, describes the manner in which his mother made earthenware: "Pots were made only on warm sunshining summer days. The clay used was from a place south of Kigirktaruk; any fine sand might be used; ptarmigan feathers were the third ingredient. A little sand was added to the clay 'as salt is added to the flour' and the dough of the three ingredients was worked as white cooks work...
Page 357 - Alaskan sources) that in the case of the wolf and the arlu (killer- whale?) at least during lifetime has its double, ie every wolf on land has a ta-tkok at sea that is an arlu. If the wolf has trouble in finding food on land he goes to sea and seeks his double the arlu. Here Mamayauk's knowledge becomes vague. Thus much she has heard, but she does not know if the wolf remains at sea as a wolf, if it merges with its double and they become one, or if it becomes an arlu, so that there are now two arlus,...
Page 195 - ... number of the Nunatamas have come either overland by themselves, or eastward from Point Barrow or from Kotzebue sound as passengers on whaling ships. The result is that the population in the Mackenzie delta is becoming mixed in blood, has already been deeply influenced in its culture characteristics, and has taken up many strange words into the spoken language.
Page 395 - edible clay" from a cutbank on the Kanianirk part of the Colville (S. bank) between the Killirk and Ninflolik branches. The specimen is in flakes and powder. Seller considered the clay a true food but says it is eaten in large quantities only at times of scarcity or when travelers run out of food. Many eat a little now and then, seller (Kanianirmiut woman) says she puts a little on her tongue almost...

Bibliographic information