The Plays of William Shakespeare: With the Corrections and Illustrations of Various Commentators, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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C. and A. Conrad, 1805
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Page 337 - Our doubts are traitors, And make us lose the good we oft might win, By fearing to attempt.
Page 166 - O spirit of love ! how quick and fresh art thou, That, notwithstanding thy capacity Receiveth as the sea...
Page 387 - I humbly thank you. To sue to live, I find, I seek to die : And. seeking death, find life : Let it come on.
Page 224 - A blank, my lord. She never told her love, But let concealment, like a worm i' the bud, Feed on her damask cheek: she pined in thought, And with a green and yellow melancholy She sat like patience on a monument, Smiling at grief.
Page 81 - The rest complains of cares to come. The flowers do fade, and wanton fields To wayward winter reckoning yields. A honey tongue, a heart of gall Is fancy's spring, but sorrow's fall.
Page 312 - Heaven doth with us as we with torches do, Not light them for themselves ; for if our virtues Did not go forth of us, 'twere all alike As if we had them not. Spirits are not finely...
Page 337 - We must not make a scarecrow of the law, Setting it up to fear the birds of prey, And let it keep one shape, till custom make it Their perch, and not their terror.
Page 353 - Well believe this, No ceremony that to great ones 'longs, Not the king's crown, nor the deputed sword, The marshal's truncheon, nor the judge's robe, Become them with one half so good a grace, As mercy does.
Page 219 - What years i' faith? VIOLA About your years my Lord. DUKE Too old by heaven: let still the woman take An elder than herself, so wears she to him; So sways she level in her husband's heart: For boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn, Than women's are.
Page 206 - O mistress mine, where are you roaming ? O, stay and hear; your true love's coming, That can sing both high and low: Trip no further, pretty sweeting; Journeys end in lovers meeting, Every wise man's son doth know.

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