Java message service

Front Cover
O'Reilly, 2001 - Computers - 220 pages
2 Reviews
This book is a thorough introduction to Java Message Service (JMS), the standard Java application program interface (API) from Sun Microsystems that supports the formal communication known as "messaging" between computers in a network. JMS provides a common interface to standard messaging protocols and to special messaging services in support of Java programs. The messages exchange crucial data between computers, rather than between users--information such as event notification and service requests. Messaging is often used to coordinate programs in dissimilar systems or written in different programming languages. Using the JMS interface, a programmer can invoke the messaging services of IBM's MQSeries, Progress Software's SonicMQ, and other popular messaging product vendors. In addition, JMS supports messages that contain serialized Java objects and messages that contain Extensible Markup Language (XML) pages. Messaging is a powerful new paradigm that makes it easier to uncouple different parts of an enterprise application. Messaging clients work by sending messages to a message server, which is responsible for delivering the messages to their destination. Message delivery is asynchronous, meaning that the client can continue working without waiting for the message to be delivered. The contents of the message can be anything from a simple text string to a serialized Java object or an XML document. Java Message Serviceshows how to build applications using the point-to-point and publish-and-subscribe models; how to use features like transactions and durable subscriptions to make an application reliable; and how to use messaging within Enterprise JavaBeans. It also introduces a new EJB type, the MessageDrivenBean, that is part of EJB 2.0, and discusses integration of messaging into J2EE.

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Review: Java Message Service

User Review  - Russell - Goodreads

An excellent resource for JMS patterns, design recommendations and contextual implementation for both JEE and Spring environments. Read full review

Review: Java Message Service

User Review  - Linda - Goodreads

This book on JMS does a decent job of introducing Java messaging and has good sample code. Where it falls short is in the places where JMS itself falls short. It glosses over JMS shortcomings and ... Read full review

Contents

Understanding the Messaging Paradigm
1
Developing a Simple Example
17
Anatomy of a JMS Message
34
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Richard Monson-Haefel is the author of Enterprise JavaBeans, 3rd Edition, Java Message Service and one of the world's leading experts and book authors on Enterprise Java. He is the lead architect of OpenEJB, an open source EJB container used in Apple Computer's WebObjects plateform, and has consulted as an architect on J2EE, CORBA, Java RMI and other distributed computing projects over the past several years.