The New Annual Register, Or General Repository of History, Politics, and Literature, for the Year ... (Google eBook)

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G. Robinson, Pater-noster-Row, 1787 - English poetry
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Page 205 - Require the borrow'd gloss of art ? Speak not of fate : ah ! change the theme, And talk of odours, talk of wine, Talk of the flowers that round us bloom : 'Tis all a cloud, 'tis all a dream ; To love and joy thy thoughts confine, Nor hope to pierce the sacred gloom.
Page 201 - Cook's person was in any danger, otherwise he would have detained the prince, which no doubt would have been a great check on the Indians. One man was...
Page 63 - ... that our civil rights have no dependence on our religious opinions any more than our opinions in physics or geometry; that therefore the proscribing any citizen as unworthy the public confidence by laying upon him an incapacity of being called to offices of trust and emolument unless he profess or renounce this or that religious opinion is depriving him injuriously of those privileges and advantages to which, in common with his fellow citizens, he has a natural right...
Page 90 - ... to trade with the same Liberty, and Security, from the Places, Ports, and Havens of those who are Enemies of both or either Party, without any opposition or Disturbance whatsoever, not only directly from the Places of the Enemy aforementioned to neutral Places; but also from one Place belonging to an Enemy, to another Place belonging to an Enemy, whether they be under the Jurisdiction of the same Prince or under Several...
Page 81 - He had made it an argument of posts ; and conducted his reasoning upon principles of trigonometry, as well as logic. There were certain detached data, like advanced works, to keep the enemy at a distance from the main object in debate. Strong provisions covered the flanks of his assertions. His very queries were in casements.
Page 205 - SWEET maid, if thou would'st charm my sight, And bid these arms thy neck infold ; That rosy cheek, that lily hand, Would give thy poet more delight Than all Bocara's vaunted gold, Than all the gems of Samarcand.
Page 63 - ... established and maintained false religions over the greatest part of the world, and through all time; that to compel a man to furnish contributions of money for the propagation of opinions which he disbelieves...
Page 64 - That no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested or burthened, in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief; but that all men shall be free to profess, and by argument to maintain, their opinions in matters of religion, and that the same shall in no wise diminish, enlarge or affect their civil capacities.
Page 202 - I need make no reflection on the great loss we suffered on this occasion, or attempt to describe what we felt. It is enough to say that no man was ever more beloved or admired ; and it is truly painful to reflect that he seems to have fallen a sacrifice merely for want of being properly supported ; a fate singularly to be lamented as having fallen to his lot, who had ever been conspicuous for his care of those under his command, and who seemed to the last to pay as much attention to their preservation...
Page 208 - Why slight the gifts of Nature's hand ? What wanderer from his native land E'er left himself behind ? The restless thought and wayward will, And discontent attend him still, Nor quit him while he lives ; At sea, care follows in the wind ; At land, it mounts the pad behind, Or with the post-boy drives.

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