Dr Seuss's Oh, the Places You'll Go Pop-Up!

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Robin Corey Books, Random House, Incorporated, 2010 - Juvenile Fiction - 18 pages
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Dr. Seuss'sOh, the Places Youíll Go!is a wonderfully wise and joyous ode to finding oneís path through the maze of life. In celebration of its 20th anniversary, this classic bestseller has been transformed into a popup book by master paper engineer David A. Carter. Filled with glorious pop-ups, detailed pop-up booklets, special effects, and the complete original text, this classic bursts with vibrant new energy. Itís the perfect diploma for graduates of all ages, and an ideal gift for anyone starting out on a new adventure.

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Dr. Seussはサンディエゴに長く住んでいたらしく、息子の行く保育園では毎年Dr. Seussの誕生日に絵本を読んで聞かせるらしい。何冊か友人に贈ってもらったDr. Seuss本の中で、これが一番のお気に入り。たぶん晩年の作品。子供が読んでわかるかどうかは別として、人生山あり谷ありについて語っている。大人が読んでも考えさせらる。  

About the author (2010)

Certainly the most popular of all American writers and illustrators of picture books, Geisel made his pseudonym Dr. Seuss famous to several generations of children and their parents. Geisel developed a rhythmic form of poetry that relied on quick rhymes and wordplay reminiscent of Mother Goose rhymes. He combined this with exaggerated cartoonlike illustrations of fantasy characters to entice children into stories that contained important messages, often presented with a great deal of irony and satire. Geisel always embraced the imagination of children and condemned adults' inability to join into it, using the child's view to reveal the flaws in society. His first picture book, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street (1937), describes a child's adding more and more imaginative elements to the story that he plans to tell about what he saw on the way home, only to end with the child actually telling the truth: he saw only a very uninteresting horse and cart. The Cat in the Hat (1957), written as a beginning reader, portrays two children having a magical afternoon with a strange cat while their mother is away, complete with a frantic cleanup before their mother can find out what they have done. This is probably his most famous work. Geisel's later books took on social questions more directly. The Butter-Battle Book (1984) condemned the cold war, and it is often removed from children's sections of libraries for political reasons. Likewise, The Lorax (1971), which condemned the destruction of the ecology, has also been banned. Altogether, Geisel wrote and illustrated 47 books, which have sold more than 100 million copies in 18 languages. In 1984 he received a Pulitzer Prize for his contributions to children's literature. More than a dozen of his books are still in print. His title The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories made Publisher's Weekly Best Seller List for 2011. In 2012 his work The Cat in The Hat made The New York Times Best Seller List.

David A. Carter was born March 4, 1957 in Salt Lake City. Utah. He attended Utah State University where he studied art and illustration. David worked several years as graphic designer and a paste up artist. While working at one job he learned the fine art of Paper-Engineering and Pop-Up bookmaking. He created his first book How Many Bugs in a Box? and has created more than 50 pop-up books since. David lives in California with his wife and daughters where he grows vegetables and native plants and does volunteer work.

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