A Chesley Bonestell Space Art Chronology (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Universal-Publishers, 1999 - Art - 256 pages
0 Reviews
Chesley Bonestell has been called the "Father of Space Art." His photorealistic paintings of the Moon and planets, and other worlds beyond, have awed us since they were first published, over half a century ago. Moreover, he showed, long before Gagarin or Glenn, what it would be like for humans to explore the vastness of space. As author Howard E. McCurdy has written in his book, Space and the American Imagination: "No artist had more impact on the emerging popular culture of space in America than Chesley Bonestell. . . . Through his visual images, he stimulated the interest of a generation of Americans and showed how space travel would be accomplished." Considering his great influence on both the public interest in space flight and the actual development of a national space program, it is therefore both surprising and unfortunate that, heretofore, there has not been available a bibliography documenting those places where Bonestell's art appeared in print. This book fills that void. Written in cooperation with the artist's widow and his estate managers, A Chesley Bonestell Space Art Chronology contains well over 700 entries and is the definitive reference guide to publications containing Bonestell's space art. In praise of it, the illustrator Vincent Di Fate says: "This entertaining and scholarly work is an invaluable and indispensable treasure for the vast legions of Bonestell's fans. [T]houghtful, engrossing and utterly thorough . . . [it] provides the cosmic ride of a lifetime."
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Space Art Chronology
3
Supplement
185
SELECTED ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS
193
MAJOR BOOKS CONTAINING BONESTELL SPACE ART
195
INDEX OF AUTHORS AND EDITORS
199
INDEX OF BOOKS
209
INDEX OF PERIODICALS
215
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
221
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xxiv - Congress the national commitment to land a man on the moon and return him safely to Earth before the end of the decade.
Page xix - Bonestell knows more about the surface appearance of the Moon than any other living man; he searched around and found one he liked the crater Harpalus, in high northern latitude, facing the Earth. High latitude was necessary so that the Earth would appear down near the horizon where the camera could see it and still pick up some lunar landscape; northern latitude was preferred so that Earth would appear in the conventional and recognizable schoolroom-globe attitude.
Page xxii - In my many years of association with Chesley, I have learned to respect, nay fear, this wonderful artist's obsession with perfection. My file cabinet is filled with sketches of rocket ships I had prepared to help him in his artwork only to have them returned to me with penetrating, detailed questions or blistering criticism of some inconsistency or oversight.
Page xxii - Von Braun would send me sketches drawn on engineer's graph paper, which I convert-ed into working drawings and then into perspective. The courses I had had at Co-lumbia [where he worked toward, but did not complete, his architecture degree] enabled me to handle some very complicated problems.

About the author (1999)

Schuetz is a Fellow of the British Interplanetary Society, a Senior Member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and a member of the Air Force Space Operations Association.

Bibliographic information