Theology and the Scientific Imagination from the Middle Ages to the Seventeenth Century

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Princeton University Press, 1986 - Religion - 421 pages
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This pioneering work in the history of science, which originated in a series of three Gauss Seminars given at Princeton University in 1984, demonstrated how the roots of the scientific revolution lay in medieval scholasticism. A work of intellectual history addressing the metaphysical foundations of modern science, Theology and the Scientific Imagination raised and transformed the level of discourse on the relations of Christianity and science. Amos Funkenstein was one of the world's most distinguished scholars of Jewish history, medieval intellectual history, and the history of science. Called a genius and Renaissance man by his academic colleagues, Funkenstein was legendary for his ability to recite long literary passages verbatim and from memory in Latin, German, French, Hebrew, Yiddish, and Greek decades after he had last read them. A winner of the coveted Israel Prize for History, Funkenstein was born and raised in Palestine and received his Ph.D. in history and philosophy at the Free University of Berlin in 1965, as one of the first Jewish students to receive a doctorate in Germany after World War II.

Author of seven books and more than fifty scholarly articles in four languages, Funkenstein was at the height of his powers in Theology and the Scientific Imagination, which ends with the author's influential discernment of the seventeenth century's "unprecedented fusion" of scientific and religious language. It remains a fundamental text to historians and philosophers of science.

  

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
3
B The Themes
10
C A Differential History
12
D Ideas and Ideals of Science
18
GODS OMNIPRESENCE GODS BODY AND FOUR IDEALS OF SCIENCE
23
B The Original Setting of the Ideals
31
C A Short History of Gods Corporeality and Presence
42
D Late Medieval Nominalism and Renaissance Philosophy
57
E Newton and Leibniz
192
DIVINE PROVIDENCE AND THE COURSE OF HISTORY
202
The Exegetical Principle of Accommodation
213
C Accommodation and the Divine Law
222
D Accommodation and the Course of Universal History
243
E History CounterHistory and Secularization
271
F Vicos Secularized Providence and His New Science
279
DIVINE AND HUMAN KNOWLEDGE KNOWING BY DOING
290

E Descartes and More
72
F Hobbes Spinoza and Malebranche
80
G Newton
89
H Leibniz
97
DIVINE OMNIPOTENCE AND LAWS OF NATURE
117
B Potentia Dei Absoluta et Ordinata
124
C Ideal Experiments and the Laws of Motion
152
D Descartes Eternal Truths and Divine Omnipotence
179
B Construction and Metabasis Mathematization and Mechanization
299
C The Construction of Nature and the Construction of Society
327
CONCLUSION FROM SECULAR THEOLOGY TO THE ENLIGHTENMENT
346
B Enlightenment and Education
357
C Theology and Science
360
BIBLIOGRAPHY
365
INDEX
401
Copyright

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