The History of Dartmouth College (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Houghton, Osgood, 1878 - 474 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 461 - An Act for the further security of His Majesty's person and Government, and the succession of the Crown in the Heirs of the late Princess Sophia, being Protestants, and for extinguishing the hopes of the pretended Prince of Wales, and his open and secret abettors...
Page 373 - Fourth. An annual report shall be made regarding the progress of each college, recording any improvements and experiments made, with their cost and results, and such other matters, including State industrial and economical statistics, as may be supposed useful...
Page 459 - And we do further, of our special grace, certain knowledge and mere motion, for us, our heirs and successors, grant...
Page 297 - The law of the Lord is perfect, converting the soul : the testimony of the Lord is sure, making wise the simple. The statutes of the Lord are right, rejoicing the heart : the commandment of the Lord is pure, enlightening the eyes.
Page 207 - ... take the gods and heroes for historical beings, I shall tell him at the same time that the ancients had only an imperfect knowledge of the true God, and that these gods were overthrown when Christ came into the world. He shall believe in the letter of the Old and New Testaments, and I shall nurture in him, from his infancy, a firm faith in all that I have lost or feel uncertain about.
Page 381 - I thought not only agreeable, but enchanting, and that he seemed to me to be one of the best of men; a sentiment in which both their Majesties heartily joined. ' They say that Lord Dartmouth is an enthusiast,' said the King, ' but surely he says nothing on the subject of religion, but what every Christian may, and ought to say.
Page 457 - George the Second, by the Grace of God of Great Britain, France and Ireland King, Defender of the Faith, etc. : To all to whom these presents shall come Greeting...
Page 101 - The idea that institutions established for the use of the nation cannot be touched or modified, even to make them answer their end, because of rights gratuitously supposed in those employed to manage them in the trust for the public, may perhaps be a salutary provision against the abuses of a monarch, but is most absurd against the nation itself.
Page 460 - Act. in as full and ample a manner to all intents and purposes as if the same privileges and protections were repeated and re-enacted in this Act.
Page 254 - Refrain from these men, and let them alone: for if this counsel or this work be of men, it will come to nought: But if it be of God, ye cannot overthrow it; lest haply ye be found even to fight against God.

Bibliographic information