Breeding Superman: Nietzsche, Race and Eugenics in Edwardian and Interwar Britain

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Liverpool University Press, Jan 1, 2002 - History - 197 pages
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Before the First World War there existed an intellectual turmoil in Britain as great as any in Germany, France or Russia, as the debates over Nietzsche and eugenics in the context of early modernism reveal. With the rise of fascism after 1918, these debates became more ideologically driven, with science and vitalist philosophy being hailed in some quarters as saviours from bourgeois decadence, vituperated in others as heralding the onset of barbarism. Breeding Superman looks at several of the leading Nietzscheans and eugenicists, and challenges the long-cherished belief that British intellectuals were fundamentally uninterested in race. The result is a study of radical ideas which are conventionally written out of histories of the politics and culture of the period.
  

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Contents

The Extremes of Englishness
1
Oscar Levy A Nietzschean Vision
12
Anthony Mario Ludovici A LightWeight Superman
33
Nietzsche and Eugenics
62
Race and Eugenics
94
The Lethal Chamber in Eugenic Thought
115
From Underman to Underclass
135
Notes
140
Bibliography
167
Index
194
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About the author (2002)

Dan Stone is Lecturer in Twentieth-Century European History at Royal Holloway, University of London.

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