Making India: Colonialism, National Culture, and the Afterlife of Indian English Authority (Google eBook)

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Springer Science & Business Media, Sep 3, 2012 - Education - 266 pages
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Compared to how it looked 150 years ago at the eve of the colonial conquest, today’s India is almost completely unrecognizable. A sovereign nation, with a teeming, industrious population, it is an economic powerhouse and the world’s largest democracy. It can boast of robust legal institutions and a dizzying plurality of cultures, in addition to a lively and unrestricted print and electronic media. The question is how did it get to where it is now?

Covering the period from 1800 to 1950, this study of about a dozen makers of modern India is a valuable addition to India’s cultural and intellectual history. More specifically, it shows how through the very act of writing, often in English, these thought leaders reconfigured Indian society. The very act of writing itself became endowed with almost a charismatic authority, which continued to influence generations that came after the exit of the authors from the national stage.

By examining the lives and works of key players in the making of contemporary India, this study assesses their relationships with British colonialism and Indian traditions. Moreover, it analyzes how their use of the English language helped shape Indian modernity, thus giving rise to a uniquely Indian version of liberalism. The period was the fiery crucible from which an almost impossibly diverse and pluralistic new nation emerged through debate, dialogue, conflict, confrontation, and reconciliation.

The author shows how the struggle for India was not only with British colonialism and imperialism, but also with itself and its past. He traces the religious and social reforms that laid the groundwork for the modern sub-continental state, proposed and advocated in English by the native voices that influenced the formation India’s society. Merging culture, politics, language, and literature, this is a path breaking volume that adds much to our understanding of a nation that looks set to achieve much in the coming century.

  

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Contents

Colonialism National Culture and the Afterlife of Indian English Authority Chapter 1 Introduction
1
Colonialism National Culture and the Afterlife of Indian English Authority Chapter 2 Usable Pasts Rammohun Roys Occidentalism
13
Colonialism National Culture and the Afterlife of Indian English Authority Chapter 3 East Indian Cosmopolitanism Henry Derozios Fakeer of Jungh...
41
Colonialism National Culture and the Afterlife of Indian English Authority Chapter 4 Michael Madhusudan Dutt The Prodigals Progress
65
Colonialism National Culture and the Afterlife of Indian English Authority Chapter 5 Bankim Chandra Chatterjee Colonialism and National Conscio...
84
Colonialism National Culture and the Afterlife of Indian English Authority Chapter 6 Subjects to Change Gender Trouble and Womens Authority
103
Colonialism National Culture and the Afterlife of Indian English Authority Chapter 7 Re presenting Swami Vivekananda
129
Colonialism National Culture and the Afterlife of Indian English Authority Chapter 8 Sarojini Naidu Reclaiming a Kinship
163
Colonialism National Culture and the Afterlife of Indian English Authority Chapter 9 Home and the World Colonialism and Alter nativity in Tagores...
192
Colonialism National Culture and the Afterlife of Indian English Authority Chapter 10 Sri Aurobindo and the Renaissance in India
213
Colonialism National Culture and the Afterlife of Indian English Authority Chapter 11 The Persistent Mahatma Rereading Gandhi PostHindutva
237
Colonialism National Culture and the Afterlife of Indian English Authority Chapter 12 Conclusion Usable Pasts Possible Futures
252
Colonialism National Culture and the Afterlife of Indian English Authority Index
261
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About the author (2012)

Makarand R. Paranjape is Professor of English in the Centre for English Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. He was educated at St. Stephen's College, University of Delhi (B.A. Hons.) and at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA (Masters and Ph.D.). He is the author/editor of over thirty-five books which include works of criticism, poetry, and fiction, and has also published over 125 academic papers in books or journals published from India and abroad. His latest work includes the two monographs Another Canon: Indian Texts and Traditions in English (2009) andAltered Destinations: Self, Society, and Nation in India (2010).