Cuba's Great Struggle for Freedom: Containing a Complete Record of Spanish Tyranny and Oppression...daring Deeds of Cuban Heroes and Patriots...American Aid for the Cause of Cuba..great Resources; Products and Scenery...manners and Customs of the People, Etc...To which is Added a Full Account of the Destruction of the Battleship "Maine"... (Google eBook)

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1898 - Cuba - 644 pages
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Page 650 - Second. That it is the duty of the United States to demand, and the Government of the United States does hereby demand, that the Government of Spain at once relinquish its authority and government in the Island of Cuba and withdraw its land and naval forces from Cuba and Cuban waters.
Page 649 - For the recognition of the independence of the people of Cuba, demanding that the Government of Spain relinquish its authority and government in the island of Cuba, and to withdraw its land and naval forces from Cuba and Cuban waters, and directing the President of the United States to use the land and naval forces of the United States to carry these resolutions into effect...
Page 641 - Union and to recommend to their consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient...
Page 134 - A civil war is never solemnly declared ; it becomes such by its accidents the number, power, and organization of the persons who originate and carry it on. When the party in rebellion occupy and hold in a hostile manner a certain portion of territory; have declared their independence; have cast off their allegiance; have organized armies; have commenced hostilities against their former sovereign, the world acknowledges them as belligerents, and the contest a war.
Page 475 - Soft hour ! which wakes the wish and melts the heart Of those who sail the seas, on the first day When they from their sweet friends are torn apart ; Or fills with love the pilgrim on his way, As the far bell of vesper makes him start, Seeming to weep the dying day's decay. Is this a fancy which our reason scorns ? Ah ! surely nothing dies but something mourns.
Page 646 - The right to intervene may be justified by the very serious injury to the commerce, trade and business of our people, and by the wanton destruction of property and devastation of the island. " Fourth. Aid, which is of the utmost importance. The present condition of affairs in Cuba is a constant menace to our peace and entails upon this government an enormous expense.
Page 356 - Freedom's battle once begun, Bequeathed from bleeding sire to son, Though baffled oft, is ever won.
Page 353 - Indeed, it is not to be disguised that our attitude as a nation and our position on the globe render the acquisition of certain possessions not within our jurisdiction eminently important for our protection, if not in the future essential for the preservation of the rights of commerce and the peace of the world.
Page 648 - In the name of humanity, in the name of civilization, in behalf of endangered American interests which give us the right and the duty to speak and to act, the war in Cuba must stop.
Page 133 - Their flag and commissions are acknowledged, their revenue laws are respected, and they acquire a quasi-political recognition. On the other hand, the parent government is relieved from responsibility for acts done in the insurgent territory; its blockade of its own ports is respected, and it acquires a right to exert against neutral commerce all the powers of a party to a maritime war.

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