Ma Dear's Aprons

Front Cover
Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing, Feb 1, 2000 - Juvenile Fiction - 32 pages
4 Reviews
Little David Earl always knows what day of the week it is. He can tell by the clean, snappy-fresh apron Ma Dear is wearing -- a different color for every day. Monday means washing, with Ma Dear scrubbing at her tub in a blue apron. Tuesday is ironing, in a sunshine yellow apron that brightens Ma's spirits. And so it goes until Sunday, when Ma Dear doesn't have to wear an apron and they can set aside some special no-work time, just for themselves.

In their first collaboration, Newbery Honor author Patricia McKissack and award-winninng illustrator Floyd Cooper lovingly recreate a slice of turn-of-the-century Southern life as it was for a single African-American mother and her son.

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Review: Ma Dear's Aprons

User Review  - Rachel Dalton - Goodreads

This is a beautiful book that addresses the struggles of an African American single mother and her son in what appears to be the 19th century. It would be great to use for working on character ... Read full review

Review: Ma Dear's Aprons

User Review  - Kimberly Tardy - Goodreads

This book is wonderfully written and accurately uses the popular southern term of endearment "Ma Dear" (short for mother dear). Read full review

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Copyright

4 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2000)

Patricia C. McKissack, 1944 - Patricia C. McKissack was born on August 9, 1944 in Smyrna Tennessee. After her parents divorced, she went to live with her grandparents in St. Louis. Years later, she moved back to Tennessee with the rest of her family and made the reacquaintance of her old friend Frederick. They both attended Tennessee State University, where Patricia graduated from in 1964 with a Bachelor's Degree of Arts in English. She went on to receive her Master's in Early Childhood Literature and Media Programming at Webster University in St Louis in 1975. After college, Patricia worked as a junior high English teacher and a children's book editor, but she didn't truly enjoy either job. One day her husband asked her what she'd really like to do and she said, "Write books." They have been collaborating together on books ever since the 80's, writing over a hundred books. Frederick does the research and Pat does the writing, with subjects ranging from racism, the Civil War, slavery and biographies of famous African Americans. Pat writes fiction on her own. Patricia has won many awards, including the 1993 Newberry Honor Book Award for "The Dark Thirty: Southern Tales of the Supernatural," the 1993 Coretta Scott King Award, the Caldecott Medal for "Mirandy and Brother Wind" and the 1998 Virginia Hamilton Award for making a contribution to the field of multicultural literature for children and adolescents, as well as the NAACP Image Award for "Sojourner Truth.

Floyd Cooper has won many prestigious awards for his illustration, including the 2009 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award for The Blacker the Berry (Amistad), written by Joyce Carol Thomas, plus three previous Coretta Scott King Honors, a Da Vinci Award, and an NAACP Image Honor. Among the more than eighty books he has illustrated are Mississippi Morning, by Ruth Vander Zee (Eerdmans) and Meet Danitra Brown by Nikki Grimes (HarperCollins). Floyd lives in Pennsylvania.