The anarchist ideal and other essays (Google eBook)

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R.G. Badger, 1913 - Anarchism - 274 pages
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Page 187 - And everybody praised the Duke Who this great fight did win.' 'But what good came of it at last?' Quoth little Peterkin: 'Why, that I cannot tell,' said he, 'But 'twas a famous victory.
Page 133 - If a man were called to fix the period in the history of the world during which the condition of the human race was most happy and prosperous, he would, without hesitation, name that which elapsed from the death of Domitian to the accession of Commodus.
Page 46 - ... the wondering crowd that Socrates had been standing and thinking about something ever since the break of day. At last, in the evening after supper, some lonians out of curiosity (I should explain that this was not in winter but in summer), brought out their mats and slept in the open air that they might watch him and see whether he would stand all night. There he stood all night until the following morning; and with the return of light he offered up a prayer to the sun, and went his way.
Page 90 - And how hear we every man in our own tongue, wherein we were born? Parthians, and Medes, and Elamites, and the dwellers in Mesopotamia, and in Judea, and Cappadocia, in Pontus, and Asia, Phrygia, and Pamphylia, in Egypt, and in the parts of Libya about Cyrene, and strangers of Rome, Jews and proselytes, Cretes and Arabians, we do hear them speak in our tongues the wonderful works of God.
Page 224 - Ministers and Upholsterers and Confectioners of modern Europe undertake in jointstock company, to make one Shoeblack HAPPY? They cannot accomplish it, above an hour or two for the Shoeblack also has a Soul quite other than his Stomach; and would require, if you consider it, for his permanent satisfaction and saturation, simply this allotment, no more, and no less; God's infinite Universe altogether to himself, therein to enjoy infinitely, and fill every wish as fast as it rose.
Page 187 - Those who desire this dreadful literature can find it ; it has a ' disciplinary value ;' but I will not even enumerate it in a footnote. The only amusing part of it is that Fechner's critics should always feel bound, after smiting his theories hip and thigh and leaving not a stick of them standing, to wind up by saying that nevertheless to him belongs the imperishable glory of first formulating them and thereby turning psychology into an exact science (!). " ' And everybody praised the duke Who this...
Page 45 - And, whatever the world thinks, he who hath not much meditated upon God, the human mind, and the summum bonum, may possibly make a thriving earthworm, but will most indubitably make a sorry patriot and a sorry statesman.
Page 46 - One morning he was thinking about something which he could not resolve; he would not give it up, but continued thinking from early dawn until noon there he stood fixed in thought; and at noon attention was drawn to him, and the rumor ran through the wondering crowd that Socrates had been standing and thinking about something ever since the break of day.
Page 240 - ... for attaining our end, we must also include the whole science of Medicine, and, as many difficult things are by contrivance rendered easy, and we can in this way gain much time and convenience, the science of Mechanics must in no way be despised.
Page 72 - My heart leaps up when I behold A rainbow in the sky : So was it when my life began, So is it now I am a man, So be it when I shall grow old 1600 Or let me die ! The Child is father of the Man : And I could wish my days to be Bound each to each by natural piety.

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