The American Journal of Science, Volumes 165-166 (Google eBook)

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J.D. & E.S. Dana, 1903 - Science
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Page 80 - To explore, enjoy and render accessible the mountain regions of the Pacific Coast; to publish authentic information concerning them; to enlist the support and cooperation of the people and the Government in preserving the forests and other natural features of the Sierra Nevada Mountains.
Page 344 - ... woodpecker taps a tree, though with much less noise, from time to time inserting the end of the slender finger into the worm-holes, as a surgeon would a probe. At length he came to a part of the branch which evidently gave out an interesting sound, for he began to tear it with his strong teeth. He rapidly stripped off the bark, cut into the wood, and exposed the nest of a grub, which he daintily picked out of its bed with the slender tapping finger, and conveyed the luscious morsel to his mouth.
Page 81 - Several parties of surveyors are now nearly in readiness to commence the work north of the town mentioned, and we confidently hope, that during the ensuing year the chief part of the subdivisions which remain to be done, may be completed. It is not my intention, at this time, to enter into a minute description of the order of superposition of the rocks, over the large...
Page 344 - Just at sunset the Aye-Aye crept from under his blanket, yawned, stretched, and betook himself to his tree, where his movements are lively and graceful, though by no means so quick as those of a squirrel. Presently he came to one of the worm-eaten branches, which he began to examine most attentively ; and bending forward his ears, and applying his nose close to the bark, he rapidly tapped the surface with the curious second digit, as a woodpecker taps a tree, though with much less noise, from time...
Page 95 - If a solid piece of radium nitrate is brought near a blende screen, and the surface examined with a pocket lens magnifying about 20 diameters, scintillating spots are seen to be sparsely scattered over the surface. On bringing the radium nearer the screen the scintillations become more numerous and brighter, until when close together the flashes follow each other so quickly that the surface looks like a turbulent luminous sea.
Page 194 - But it should be distinctly stated, that if the results obtained when the numbers of degrees of freedom are enormous coincide sensibly with the general laws of thermodynamics, however interesting and significant this coincidence may be, we are still far from having explained the phenomena of nature with respect to these laws. For, as compared with the case of nature, the systems which we have considered are of an ideal simplicity.
Page 87 - ... an incontestibly stiller image than when still air was used. As a further test, a series of artificial double stars was now provided, and the concave mirror, acting both as collimator and objective, brought the images to focus, where they were examined by an eyepiece. With the stillest air obtainable, the images were not sharp and only the coarsest doubles were resolvable. Then the blower was started and the definition immediately became sharp. Violently stirring the air in the tube, then, eliminates...
Page 274 - Since the temperatures of a block and its enclosing magma are practically identical, the final step in deciding on their relative densities in depth is taken, if it can be shown what is the relative compression suffered by the solid and liquid. Again we must have recourse to the valuable experiments of Barus as those, of any known to the writer, most nearly related to the problem at issue. He concludes, as a net result of his investigations, that ' the relation of the meltingpoint to pressure in...
Page 344 - Presently he came to one of the worm-eaten branches, which he began to examine most attentively ; and bending forward his ears, and applying his nose close to the bark, he rapidly tapped the surface with the curious second digit, as a woodpecker taps a tree, though with much less noise, from time to time inserting the end of the slender finger into the worm-holes, as a surgeon would a probe. At length he came to a part of the branch which evidently gave out an interesting sound, for he began to tear...
Page 86 - boiling " of the image is due to air without the tube, but a not unimportant part to the air within it; and in the preliminary experiments the air, kept still in the tube by treating it with the ordinary precautions, was found to have little effect on the ordinary "boiling" of the image, which so seriously prejudices the definition.

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