Plato Apology

Front Cover
James J. Helm
Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, 1997 - Foreign Language Study - 127 pages
29 Reviews
The revised edition of this popular textbook features a vocabulary and grammatical notes, revised, now appearing on the same page as the text, sentence diagrams, principal parts of verbs, both by Stephanus page and alphabetical, word frequency list for words occurring more than twice, and a complete vocabulary.
  

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Review: Apology

User Review  - Iona - Goodreads

I decided to read this because a) it was free, and b) I was interested in dipping my toes into philosophical thought. Incidentally, Plato's Apology is a fantastic starting point for any like-minded ... Read full review

Review: Apology

User Review  - Zadignose - Goodreads

Those who haven't read this, or who may have forgotten their reading of Plato, may still be very familiar with the famous quote "The unexamined life is not worth living." Well, context renders it more ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
95
Section 3
100
Section 4
113
Section 5
114
Section 6
115
Section 7
116
Section 8
120
Section 9
123
Section 10
126
Section 11
128
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Plato was born c. 427 B.C. in Athens, Greece, to an aristocratic family very much involved in political government. Pericles, famous ruler of Athens during its golden age, was Plato's stepfather. Plato was well educated and studied under Socrates, with whom he developed a close friendship. When Socrates was publically executed in 399 B.C., Plato finally distanced himself from a career in Athenian politics, instead becoming one of the greatest philosophers of Western civilization. Plato extended Socrates's inquiries to his students, one of the most famous being Aristotle. Plato's The Republic is an enduring work, discussing justice, the importance of education, and the qualities needed for rulers to succeed. Plato felt governors must be philosophers so they may govern wisely and effectively. Plato founded the Academy, an educational institution dedicated to pursuing philosophic truth. The Academy lasted well into the 6th century A.D., and is the model for all western universities. Its formation is along the lines Plato laid out in The Republic. Many of Plato's essays and writings survive to this day. Plato died in 347 B.C. at the age of 80.

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