The imperial gazetteer of India [by] W.W. Hunter (Google eBook)

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1881
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Page 146 - Although the rdyatwdrl system of settlement may be regarded as the characteristic feature of Madras, yet proprietary estates on the Bengal model are by no means rare in parts of the Presidency. These estates conform generally to one of two types. They are either the remains of ancient principalities, which the holder cannot sell or encumber beyond his own life interest, the succession being hereditary in the eldest son ; or they are creations of British rule, dating from 1802, and subject to the...
Page 93 - Faizabad, while the main body attacked from the south-east. After a week's hard fighting, from the 9th to the 15th March, the rebels were completely defeated, and their posts captured one by one. Most of the insurgents, however, escaped. As soon as it became clear that Lucknow had been permanently recovered, and that the enemy, as a combined body, had ct'ased to exist, Sir Colin Campbell broke up the British Oudh army, and the work of reorganisation began.
Page 93 - They surrounded the greater part of the city, for a circuit of twenty miles, with an external line of defences, extending from the Gumti to the canal. An earthen parapet lay behind the canal ; a second line of earthworks connected the Moti Mahal, the mess-house, and the Imambara ; while the Kaisar Bagh constituted the rebel citadel. Stockade works and parapets...
Page 187 - On the side of the rock looking towards the alligators' pool, the perpendicular face of the cliff a covered with a coating of smooth chunam, and from the lower part the principal spring gushes forth through a small fissure. The water is received into two stone reservoirs, and then escapes through several outlets to the swamp below. In one of them was a large alligator, with about a dozen young ones, which the inhabitants have named the " Peacock " (or Mor), and they consider him to be the progenitor...
Page 459 - as extensive, populous, and rich as the city of London, with this difference that there are individuals in the first possessing infinitely greater property than in the last.
Page 216 - Mahoba for twenty generations, until Parmal, the first to drop the suffix of Varmma or Brahm, was conquered by Prithwi Raj. About 1195 AD, the town fell into the hands of Kutab-ud-din. The existing monuments of Muhammadan date include the tomb of Jalhan Khan, constructed from the fragments of a Sivaite temple; and a mosque. also built of Chandel materials, and bearing an inscription in Persian, which assigns its foundation to the year 1322 AD, during the reign of (jhiyas-ud-dm Tughlak.
Page 373 - Songs, called ratwdi, on pastoral and agricultural subjects, are common. The dialect is harsh and unpolished, so that no difference can be made when addressing a male or female, or with respect to social distinctions. They are given to the use of intoxicating drink, are very superstitious, and have great faith in omens.
Page 147 - ... fee-simple. Possession for fifty years was decided to give a good title. In the case of personal grants, the holder was offered the alternative of retaining the land subject to the liability of lapse, and without the power of alienation ; or of enfranchising it by the payment of a moderate quit-rent or a lump sum. Service tenures, where the service was still performed, and religious endowments, were continued on the existing terms ; where the services were no longer required, the holders were...
Page 193 - Another proof of antiquity is the character of the sculpture. We have on this rath most of the Hindu Pantheon, such as Brahma and Vishnu ; Siva, too, appears in most of his characters, but all in forms more subdued than to be found elsewhere.
Page 92 - Bagh, the chief rebel stronghold. The mutineers, driven to bay, fought desperately for their fortress, but before evening the whole place was in the hands of the British. As soon as Sir Colin Campbell reached the Moti Mahal, on the outskirts of the city proper, General Havelock came out from the Residency to meet him, and the second relief was successfully accomplished. " Even now, however, it remained impossible to hold Lucknow, and Sir Colin Campbell determined before undertaking any further offensive...

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