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Books Books 1 - 9 of 9 on As in the other cases mentioned, the so-called instinct is not a physiological dislike.....
" As in the other cases mentioned, the so-called instinct is not a physiological dislike. This is proved by the existence of our large mulatto population, as well as by the more ready amalgamation of the Latin peoples. It is rather an expression of social... "
Race Orthodoxy in the South: And Other Aspects of the Negro Question - Page 216
by Thomas Pearce Bailey - 1914 - 386 pages
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The Negro in the cities of the North

Survey Associates - African Americans - 1905 - 96 pages
...instinct" of the whites, which plays a most important part in the practical aspect of tha problem. Ultimately this phenomenon is a repetition of the...strong emotional value ; and this, I presume, is meant if we call such feelings instinctive. The feeling certainly has nothing to do with the question of...
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The Negro in the Cities of the North

Survey - African Americans - 1905 - 96 pages
...deeply ingrained in us that they assume a strong emotional 88 value; and this, I presume, is meant if we call such feelings instinctive. The feeling certainly...question of the vitality and ability of the mulatto. We are not prepared to give a definite answer to . the latter question, which would require painstaking...
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The Negro in the cities of the North

Survey - Biography & Autobiography - 1905 - 96 pages
...deeply ingrained in us that they assume a strong emotional value; and this, I presume, is meant if we call such feelings instinctive. The feeling certainly...question of the vitality and ability of the mulatto. We are not prepared to give a definite answer to the latter question, which would require painstaking...
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Democracy and Race Friction: A Study in Social Ethics

John Moffatt Mecklin - African Americans - 1914 - 273 pages
...particularly to the necessity of maintaining a distinct social status in order to avoid race mixture. It is rather an expression of social conditions that...strong emotional value; and this, I presume, is meant if we call such feelings instinctive." 1 From the foregoing we may certainly infer that race-antipathy...
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Readings in Social Problems

Albert Benedict Wolfe - Social problems - 1916 - 804 pages
...particularly to the necessity of maintaining a distinct social status in order to avoid race-mixture. As in other cases mentioned, the so-called instinct is not...environment represent a number of important problems. welfare of our nation. The anatomy of the American negro is not well known ; and, notwithstanding the...
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Spectres of 1919: Class and Nation in the Making of the New Negro

Barbara Foley - History - 2003 - 313 pages
...instinct" evoked in many whites by the presence of mulattoes was not a "physiological dislike" but "an expression of social conditions that are so deeply...in us that they assume a strong emotional value." " [Ultimately," Boas declared, "race instinct" is "a repetition of the old instinct and fear of the...
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The Languages of Difference: American Writers and Anthropologists ...

Ronald E. Martin - History - 2005 - 280 pages
...exhibit. It's just the old fear of the lower, less privileged social classes by those of higher status, "an expression of social conditions that are so deeply...in us that they assume a strong emotional value." We need more scientific study, he repeatedly urges, as an antidote to vestigial superstitions and as...
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The Survey, Volume 15

Edward Thomas Devine, Paul Underwood Kellogg - Charities - 1906
...instinct" of the whites, which plays a most important part in the practical aspect of the problem. Ultimately this phenomenon is a repetition of the...strong emotional value; and this, I presume, is meant if we call such feelings instinctive. The feeling certainly has nothing to do with the question of...
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The Survey, Volume 15

Edward Thomas Devine, Paul Underwood Kellogg - Charities - 1906
...particularly to the necessity of maintaining a distinct social status in order to avoid race mixture. Ae in the other cases mentioned, the so-called instinct...strong emotional value ; and this, I presume, is meant if we call such feelings instinctive. The feeling certainly has nothing to do with the question of...
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