The Leningrad Blockade, 1941-1944: A New Documentary History from the Soviet Archives

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Yale University Press, Jun 26, 2012 - History - 486 pages
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Based largely on formerly top-secret Soviet archival documents (including 66 reproduced documents and 70 illustrations), this book portrays the inner workings of the communist party and secret police during Germany's horrific 1941–44 siege of Leningrad, during which close to one million citizens perished. It shows how the city's inhabitants responded to the extraordinary demands placed upon them, encompassing both the activities of the political, security, and military elite as well as the actions and attitudes of ordinary Leningraders.

  

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
CHAPTER 1 Leningrad During the Second World War and Its Aftermath
15
CHAPTER 2 Who Ruled Leningrad?
78
CHAPTER 3 Policies of Total War
184
CHAPTER 4 The Struggle to Survive
262
Photo gallery
328
CHAPTER 5 The Popular Mood
329
CHAPTER 6 The Question of Organized Opposition
368
CONCLUSIONS
404
APPENDIX A Daily Bread Rations
413
APPENDIX B Official Monthly Rations for Food Other than Bread
414
APPENDIX C Rations Actually Distributed Other than Bread 1 January31 March 1942 According to Leningradskaia Pravda
416
Notes
419
Bibliography of Sources Cited
461
Index
475
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Richard Bidlack is professor of history at Washington and Lee University. Nikita Lomagin is professor of economics at St. Petersburg State University.

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