Anecdotes of the Life of the Right Honourable William Pitt, Earl of Chatham: And of the Principal Events of His Time, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Longman, Hurst, Rees & Orme, 1810
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Page 271 - To conclude, my lords, if the ministers thus persevere in misadvising and misleading the king, I will not say, that they can alienate the affections of his subjects from his crown ; but I will affirm, that they will make the crown not worth his wearing. I will not say that the king is betrayed ; but I will pronounce, that the kingdom is undone.
Page 316 - to use all the means which God and nature have put into our hands." I am astonished, I am shocked, to hear such principles confessed ; to hear them avowed in this house, or in this country.
Page 304 - If I were an American, as I am an Englishman, while a foreign troop was landed in my country, I never would lay down my arms : Never, never, never...
Page 277 - That the raising or keeping a standing army within the kingdom in time of peace, unless it be with consent of parliament, is against law.
Page 305 - ... of the woods — to delegate to the merciless Indian the defence of disputed rights, and to wage the horrors of his barbarous war against our brethren? My lords, these enormities cry aloud for redress and punishment : unless thoroughly done away, it will be a stain on the national character.
Page 270 - ... to be taken for an idiot, if they are not finally repealed. Avoid, then, this humiliating, disgraceful necessity. With a dignity becoming your exalted situation, make the first advances to concord, to peace, and happiness; for that is your true dignity, to act with prudence and justice. That you should first concede, is obvious, from sound and rational policy. Concession comes with better grace and more salutary effect from superior power. It reconciles superiority of power with the feelings...
Page 270 - I say we must necessarily undo these violent oppressive acts: they must be repealed— you will repeal them; I pledge myself for it, that you will in the end repeal them; I stake my reputation on it: I will consent to be taken for an idiot if they are not finally repealed.
Page 304 - You may swell every expence, and every effort, still more extravagantly ; pile and accumulate every assistance you can buy or borrow ; traffic and barter with every little pitiful German Prince, that sells and sends his subjects to the shambles of a foreign Prince ; your efforts are forever vain and impotent — doubly so from this mercenary aid on which...
Page 242 - Robert had heard them all he assured them that he was conscious of having meant well ; that in the present inflamed temper of the people the act could not be carried into execution without an armed force...
Page 318 - Spanish cruelty : we turn loose these savage hell-hounds against our brethren and countrymen in America, of the same language, laws, liberties, and religion ; endeared to us by every tie that should sanctify humanity.

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