The Whistler book: a monograph of the life and positin in art of James McNeill Whistler, together with a careful study of his more important works (Google eBook)

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L.C. Page & company, 1910 - 272 pages
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Page 194 - For Mr. Whistler's own sake, no less than for the protection of the purchaser, Sir Coutts Lindsay ought not to have admitted works into the gallery in which the ill-educated conceit of the artist so nearly approached the aspect of wilful imposture. I have seen, and heard, much of Cockney impudence before now ; but never expected to hear a coxcomb ask two hundred guineas for flinging a pot of paint in the public's face.
Page 61 - ... buildings lose themselves in the dim sky, and the tall chimneys become campanili, and the warehouses are palaces in the night, and the whole city hangs in the heavens, and fairy-land is before us then the wayfarer hastens home; the working man and the cultured one, the wise man and the one of pleasure, cease to understand, as they have ceased to see, and Nature, who, for once, has sung in tune, sings her exquisite song to the artist alone, her son and her master her son in that he loves...
Page 244 - In the beginning, man went forth each day some to do battle, some to the chase, others again to dig and to delve in the field all that they might gain and live or lose and die. Until there was found among them one differing from the rest, whose pursuits attracted him not, and so he stayed by the tents with the women and traced strange devices with a burnt stick upon a gourd. This man, who took no joy in the ways of his brethren, who cared not for conquest and fretted in the field this...
Page 245 - ... brethren, who cared not for conquest and fretted in the field this designer of quaint patterns this deviser of the beautiful, who perceived in Nature about him curious curvings as faces are seen in the fire this dreamer apart was the first artist. And when from the field and from afar there came back the people, they took the gourd and drank from out of it.
Page 61 - And when the evening mist clothes the riverside with poetry, as with a veil, and the poor buildings lose themselves in the dim sky, and the tall chimneys become campanili, and the warehouses are palaces in the night, and the whole city hangs in the heavens, and fairy-land is before us...
Page 131 - The one aim of the unsuspecting painter is to make his man " stand out " from the frame never doubting that, on the contrary, he should really, and in truth absolutely does, stand within the frame and at a depth behind it equal to the distance at which the painter sees his model.
Page 73 - The masterpiece should appear as the flower to the painter perfect in its bud as in its bloom with no reason to explain its presence no mission to fulfil a joy to the artist a delusion to the philanthropist a puzzle to the botanist an accident of sentiment and alliteration to the literary man.
Page 199 - Alas ! ladies and gentlemen, Art has been maligned. She has naught in common with such practices. She is a goddess of dainty thought reticent of habit, abjuring all obstrusiveness, purposing in no way to better others.
Page 199 - ... themselves. Humanity takes the place of Art, and God's creations are excused by their usefulness. Beauty is confounded with virtue, and, before a work of Art, it is asked : "What good shall it do?
Page 200 - Hence it is that nobility of action, in this life, is hopelessly linked with the merit of the work that portrays it; and thus the people have acquired the habit of looking, as who should say, not at a picture, but through it, at some human fact, that shall, or shall not, from a social point of view, better their mental or moral state.

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