Festivals, Games, and Amusements, Ancient and Modern (Google eBook)

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H. Colburn and R. Bentley, 1831 - Amusements - 382 pages
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Page 387 - By and by we hear news of shipwreck in the same place, and then we are to blame if we accept it not for a rock. Upon the back of that comes out a hideous monster, with fire and smoke, and then the miserable beholders are bound to take it for a cave...
Page 353 - And chase the new-blown bubbles of the day. Ah ! let not Censure term our fate our choice, The stage but echoes back the public voice; The drama's laws, the drama's patrons give, For we that live to please, must please to live.
Page 297 - Therefore the poet Did feign that Orpheus drew trees, stones, and floods ; Since nought so stockish, hard, and full of rage, But music for the time doth change his nature : The man that hath no music in himself, Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils ; The motions of his spirit are dull as night, And his affections dark as Erebus : Let no such man be trusted.
Page 18 - Now such was the height of Greek fashions, and increase of heathenish manners, through the exceeding profaneness of Jason, that ungodly wretch, and no high-priest, that the priests had no courage to serve any more at the altar ; but despising the temple, and neglecting the sacrifices, hastened to be partakers of the unlawful allowance in the place of exercise, after the game of discus called them forth ; not setting by the honours of their fathers, but liking the glory of the Grecians best of all.
Page 136 - Henry VIII., " it is enough for the sons of the nobility to wind their horn and carry their hawk fair, and leave study and learning to the children of meaner people.
Page 161 - Come, let us go while we are in our prime; And take the harmless folly of the time.
Page 176 - Box, or money gathered against that time, that masses might be made by the priests to the saints to forgive the people the debaucheries of that time : and from this, servants had the liberty to get box money, that they too might be enabled to pay the priest for his masses, knowing well the truth of the proverb : "No Penny, No Pater Noster." Athenian Oracle, by Dunton, i., 360.
Page 161 - We shall grow old apace, and die Before we know our liberty. Our life is short, and our days run As fast away as does the sun. And, as a vapour or a drop of rain, Once lost, can ne'er be found again, So when or you or I are made A fable, song, or fleeting shade, All love, all liking, all delight Lies drown'd with us in endless night. Then, while time serves, and we are but decaying, Come, my Corinna, come, let's go a-Maying.
Page 375 - ... each side: this extraordinary and superfluous space occasioned such an undulation, from the voice of every actor, that generally what they said sounded like the gabbling of so many people in the lofty aisles in a cathedral.
Page 159 - RULES TO KNOW WHEN THE MOVEABLE FEASTS AND HOLYDAYS BEGIN. EASTER DAY, on which the rest depend, is always the First Sunday after the Full Moon which happens upon, or next after the Twenty-first Day of March ; and if the Full Moon happens upon a Sunday, Easter Day is the Sunday after.

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