Transactions, American Philosophical Society (Old Series, vol. 1, 1769-71) (Google eBook)

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American Philosophical Society
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Contents

I
li
II
2
III
5
IV
8
V
42
VI
93
VII
101
VIII
109
XLVII
51
XLVIII
57
XLIX
74
L
101
LI
118
LII
122
LIII
141
LIV
159

IX
118
X
1
XI
5
XII
12
XIII
27
XIV
45
XV
47
XVI
50
XVII
54
XVIII
75
XIX
198
XX
205
XXI
218
XXII
224
XXIII
231
XXIV
234
XXV
235
XXVI
239
XXVII
244
XXVIII
246
XXIX
250
XXX
255
XXXI
272
XXXII
281
XXXIII
291
XXXIV
293
XXXV
300
XXXVI
303
XXXVII
315
XXXVIII
320
XXXIX
324
XL
338
XLI
339
XLIII
1
XLIV
37
XLV
42
XLVI
50
LV
166
LVI
170
LVII
173
LVIII
175
LIX
177
LX
178
LXI
181
LXII
183
LXIII
185
LXIV
195
LXV
196
LXVI
197
LXVII
199
LXVIII
201
LXIX
206
LXX
212
LXXI
217
LXXIII
225
LXXIV
231
LXXV
236
LXXVI
239
LXXVII
246
LXXVIII
251
LXXIX
260
LXXX
263
LXXXI
284
LXXXII
289
LXXXIII
294
LXXXIV
330
LXXXV
335
LXXXVI
347
LXXXVII
366
LXXXVIII
383
LXXXIX
392
XC
396
Copyright

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Page lii - ... age of the, moon, the position of the planets, the cycle of the years, and many other serviceable notices ; and these movements may fulfil their purposes with more or less perfection, according as the mechanism is better or worse contrived, or better or worse executed, or...
Page 16 - Fig. 4), which is common, as being there, when open, more out of the way, it follows that, when the door is only opened in part, a current of air...
Page 17 - ... to ascend the funnels as the cool of the evening comes on, and this current will continue till perhaps nine or ten o'clock the next morning, when it begins to...
Page 68 - A still easier experiment may be made with the candle itself. Hold your hand near the side of its flame, and observe the heat it gives ; then blow it out, the hand remaining in the same place, and observe what heat may be given by the smoke...
Page 314 - I happened to be consulted on the occasion; and it appearing strange to me, that there should be such a difference between two places scarce a day's run asunder, especially when the merchant ships are generally deeper laden, and more weakly manned than the packets, and had from London the whole length of the river and channel to run before they left the land of England, while the packets had only to go from Falmouth, I could not but think the fact misunderstood or misrepresented.
Page 64 - ... one of the upright corner funnels behind the niche, through which it ascends into the chimney, thus heating that half of the box and that side of the niche. The other part of the divided flame passes...
Page 21 - ... to and touches it within, my whole body being full of moisture, and finding that I can lie two hours in a bath twice a week, covered with water, which certainly is much damper than any air can be, and this for years together, without catching cold, or being in any other manner disordered by it, I no longer dread mere moisture, either in air or in sheets or shirts ; and I find it of importance to the happiness of life, the being freed from vain terrors, especially of objects that we are every...
Page 314 - Nantucket sea-captain of my acquaintance, to whom I communicated the affair. He told me he believed the fact might be true ; but the difference was owing to this, that the Rhode Island captains were acquainted with the Gulf Stream, which those of the English packets were not. "We are well acquainted with that stream...
Page 23 - I had the wainscot taken down, and discovered that the funnel, which went up behind it, had a crack many feet in length, and wide enough to admit my arm, a breach very dangerous with regard to fire, and occasioned probably by an apparent irregular settling of one side of the house. The air entering this breach freely, destroyed the drawing force of the funnel. The remedy would have been, filling up the breach, or rather rebuilding the funnel; but the landlord rather chose to stop up the chimney.
Page 21 - ... some are as much afraid of fresh air as persons in the hydrophobia are of fresh water. I myself had formerly this prejudice, this aerophobia, as I now account it ; and, dreading the supposed dangerous effects of cool air, I considered it as an enemy, and closed with extreme care every crevice in the rooms I inhabited. Experience has convinced me of my error. I now look upon fresh air as a friend ; I even sleep with an open window.

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