A treatise on the æropleustic art, or navigation in the air by means of kites, or buoyant sails (Google eBook)

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1851
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Page 53 - ... the air by this invention was a lady, whose courage would not be denied this test of its strength. An arm-chair was brought on the ground ; then, lowering the cordage of the kite by slackening the lower brace, the chair was firmly lashed to the main line, and the lady took her seat. The main brace being hauled taut, the huge buoyant sail rose aloft with its fair burden, continuing to ascend to the height of 100 yards. On descending she expressed herself much pleased with the easy' motion of the...
Page 53 - On descending, she expressed herself much pleased with the easy motion of the kite, and the delightful prospect she had enjoyed. Soon after this, another experiment of a similar nature took place, when the inventor's son successfully carried out a design not less safe than bold ; that of scaling, by this powerful aerial machine, the brow of a cliff 200 feet in perpendicular height.
Page 53 - ... feet in perpendicular height. Here, after safely landing, he again took his seat in a chair expressly prepared for the purpose, and, detaching the swivel-line which kept it at its elevation, glided gently down the cordage to the hand of the director. The buoyant sail employed on this occasion was thirty feet in height, with a proportionate spread of canvas. The rise of the machine was most majestic, and nothing could surpass the steadiness with which it was manoeuvred, the certainty with which...
Page 20 - Carriage," published by Longman and Co., appears the following remarks : — "These buoyant sails, possessing immense power, will, as we have before remarked, serve for floating observatories. * * * * Elevated in the air, a single sentinel, with a perspective, could watch and report the advance of the most powerful forces, while yet at a great distance. He could...
Page 54 - ... the certainty with which it answered the action of the braces, and the ease with which its power was lessened or increased. * * * Subsequently to this, an experiment of a very bold and novel character was made upon an extensive down, where a wagon with a considerable load was drawn along, whilst this huge machine, at the same time, carried an observer aloft in the air, realising almost the romance of flying.
Page 53 - Nor was less progress made in the experimental department, when large weights were required to be raised or transposed. While on this subject, we must not omit to observe that the first person who soared aloft...
Page 53 - The rise of the machine was most majestic, and nothing could surpass the steadiness with which it was manoeuvred; the certainty with which it answered the action of the braces, and the ease with which its power was lessened or increased. * * * Subsequently to this, an experiment of a very bold and novel character was made upon...
Page 19 - Carriage," published by Longman and Co., appear the following remarks: — " These buoyant sails, possessing immense power, will, as we have before remarked, serve for floating observatories. . . . Elevated in the air, a single sentinel, with a perspective, could watch and report the advance of the most powerful forces, while yet at a great distance. He could mark their line of march, the composition of their force, and their general strength, long before he could be seen by the enemy.
Page 7 - KITE. THE power of a kite twelve feet high, with a wind blowing at the rate of twenty miles an hour, is as much as a man of average strength can stand against. With a stronger gale, such a kite has been known to break a line capable of sustaining 200 Ibs.

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